Alone…

This topic contains 23 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  Petr Nowak 1 month, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #416071

    Petr Nowak
    Participant

    I like the reflections especially, not only of the man but of whole scene in front of him. Crop: I keep left and right part of building wall, tree on the left and trash can/bench on the right to express environment feeling.
    I’ve had version with more pavement in the bottom but this added perspective did compete with reflections perspective.

    Any CC? Is crop ok? Any ideas to improve shot next time?
    (Source below.)

  • #416072

    Petr Nowak
    Participant

    Original image…

  • #416076

    Tom M
    Participant

    I like it, but my thought is the tree on left adds nothing to the image. I’d crop just to the right of that tree…

     

  • #416091

    Mistyisle
    Participant

    Somewhat agree with Tom, Petr, but I would crop even more out on the left.  The strong highlights are a distraction, as is the sculpture.  I would crop virtually up to the bench that the man is sitting on.

    Not sure, but it seems on my screen that the man’s face has quite a bit of noise.  When you zoom in on it, you will be better able to tell if that is the case.  If so, then applying a bit of noise reduction, without making him too bland  …..

  • #416101

    Petr Nowak
    Participant

    Something like that?
    Yes, noise. First crop is quite heavy so more crop – more noise.

    • #416209

      Craig
      Participant

      I like this crop, irregardless of the noise. For myself it invokes a sense of sadness and/or loneliness. He (to me) seems despondent. the “trash cans” look more like a head stones.

    • #416624

      Bruce Gordon
      Participant

      I think this crop places emphasis solely on the man, creating a strong emotional impact. Well done!

  • #416107

    Federico Alegria
    Participant

    @petrnowak

    I prefer this last crop mate, I think the big problem here is the black and white conversion. What exactly are you doing with it? Because it looks like a simple desaturation, which impacts in the photo’s overall tonality.

    This shot is quite storytelling, and that structure with the small graffiti resembling a gravestone is quite important for this scene.

    I’m feeling that you are quite drawn to street photography, and you have a keen eye indeed, this shot deserved getting closer mate.

  • #416131

    Dorothy
    Participant

    Hi Petr: well i guess i see things a little differently. i like the tree on the left because i can match it to the reflection and it balances the headstone on the right., also the rock is cool. i did take a little off the right that i thought really wasn’t needed for framing as the window, tree on left and leaves across the top frame this nicely. yes i did some burning on the left and the man’s back reflection as well as the leaves which i think helps it pop. also did a little noise reduction. all that said, i like this photo a lot, it has heart and tugs at my heart plus i love the black and white.  so here is what i did.Alone by Petr edit dms

    • #416132

      Dorothy
      Participant

      actually, i think i changed my mind on the noise reduction and just used the remove dust and scratches. personally i am not crazy about the smaller crop, to me it ends up looking too busy with all the wooden scaffolding/stairs. please understand all of this is just my opinion.

  • #416159

    Petr Nowak
    Participant

    @Federico: yes, it was a simple desaturation only. What other method would you suggest?

    @dorothy: I like your crop. The right part really isn’t needed for framing.

    It’s a shot from distance (still fighting my negative feelings when shooting people on the street).  I was attracted by sitting man and his reflection behind him. I shoot quickly. I haven’t noticed structure with graffiti, tree and others elements until postprocess. So crop was made afterwards.
    Thanks for all opinions. It really helps to improve my creative process.

    • #416623

      Federico Alegria
      Participant

      Contrast by using the colors channel in Lightroom after transforming the image into black and white.

  • #416266

    Lenny Wollitz
    Participant

    Petr. in my experience there is not a one click solution when converting color to BW.   Simply removing color is only the start.  If you are using Photoshop it is still possible to download the Nik Collection for free and it’s a good place to start with tons of tutorials on the internet.  Here is my 2 pesos worth all done in Lightroom.  I agree with a previous post that the trash can looks like a head stone.

  • #416268

    Petr Nowak
    Participant

    @Lenny: I have my notices about B&W conversion methods somewhere. I should find it and use at last…. 🙂

  • #416279

    Frank
    Participant

    Your title says you want to convey the loneliness.  How does the tree and empty area to the left contribute to the emotion?  Is it important to have the tree “balance the grave stones”?  I think the grave markers are much more important to the emotion.  Graveyards can be very lonely places.  Crop out the left as suggested by Petra!!

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by  Frank.
  • #416285

    Graham Hart
    Participant

    For all we know, this man has a wonderful life and spends his days snoozing outdoors watching life pass by. Or maybe……..

    Sometimes we are loneliest in a crowd. Not exactly a crowd here I know but I think the other person, busy with a purpose, adds to the lonely inactive vibe the man is emanating…despair almost. A bit of lighting adjustment to highlight his pose and the B&W treatment to perhaps reflect a life with little if any colour.

    It’s a trash can I know but it seems like the only thing separating his sedentary existence from the movement of everyday life…is a gravestone.

  • #416300

    Petr Nowak
    Participant

    @Graham, @frank: the importance of “grave stone” and loneliest in a crowd are another great ideas.

    I see I have a problem to think out shot in action. I should focus on it and think more – shoot less. I usually see something visually attractive and shoot it without much thinking process. It’s definitely mistake.

    Btw. I’ve never get such great deep thorough constructive criticism elsewhere. I love you all… 😉

    • #416301

      Rob Eyers
      Participant

      I’ve been following this thread Petr and really haven’t had much different to add until now.

      Although I don’t disagree with thinking about what you’re shooting I do disagree with thinking too much. That can cause shooting paralysis. Many times ones instincts will say take a  shot. Articulating just why in the moment isn’t always possible but the gut knows. The accumulation of many years of shooting and life are always there so listen to the gut and take the shot.

      Of course there will be images for the bin later but there will also be discoveries of what the senses knew instantly.  We’re all lucky to be living in the age of digital photography where we have that luxury.

      Lots of interesting ideas here so far. At this point I like Dorothy’s version the best. A very nice capture Petr.

       

  • #416329

    Frank
    Participant

    Whoops…turns out that grave marker is actually a trash can!

  • #416538

    Falxy
    Participant

    Jeez Graham,overthinking is maybe a prob……………..yeah I like your image,as said the crop/centre of interest needs some thought……personally I would bring to the fore the sub and choose which background………………probably the left.

    good capture……less is more! 🙂

  • #417307

    bucweeet
    Participant

    I guess it all depends on what story you’re trying to tell Petr.

    My preference is the ‘original’ image as the wider perspective brings into play the surroundings the man is in as well as emphasizes the loneliness better.

    While to some, the tighter crop looks better, it doesn’t provide the ‘loneliness’… only a man taking a break on a bench.

    The B&W version, could stand to use more post-production to bring out better tonal quality/variation in the image.

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by  bucweeet.
  • #417310

    Petr Nowak
    Participant

    @bucweeet: I see. I remember I did shot quickly and I went away. It was a mistake. I should think more => “loneliness” => needs contrast => some other people => wait for better situation. Or I can go closer (I’d get better quality with my small chip at least…).
    Finally such a mistakes lead to more images (somewhere else) but lower quality. I should learn to recognize good opportunity and invest more time/effort and try to get great image…

    Thanks…

  • #417727

    Falxy
    Participant

    yeah…..if its any help,i like street,there really are no rules for street…………………….so going with your vision is good. 🙂

     

  • #417846

    Petr Nowak
    Participant

    @falxy: definitely. Thanks.

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