Another walk.

This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  tom dinning 8 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #43903

    tom dinning
    Blocked

    I’m getting used to this retirement stuff. Someone called me for a wedding shoot yesterday. I told them I would be available in June 2012. They said OK. Bugger!
    Now I take photos for myself all day. How nice is that?
    Today my feet took me to the local nature reserve.
    This is what presented itself.
    Howard Springs Nature reserve
    Nothing out of the ordinary. Maybe a shot to put on a postcard to the rellies down south.
    As I pondered my navel and other aging parts of my anatomy, the scene started to reveal things.
    First, a cluster of palms reflecting in the billabong.
    _DSC9084
    Then a pig nosed turtle broke the surface. Probably looking for breakfast. I became fascinated with the ripples spreading across the water, changing the shapes in the reflection.
    _DSC9085-1
    I could no longer see the reality of it all. By the time I got home and downloaded, this was all that was left in my head.
    _DSC9085

    How does that happen?
    This photography stuff is doing my brain in.

  • #57079

    Pam
    Participant

    Very cool sequence!

  • #78893

    Pam
    Participant

    Very cool sequence!

  • #57080

    Anonymous

    I have to say, the last one is by far the best. The old adage: “can’t see the forest for the trees” applies quite well when shooting. Our brains are wonderful filters. The allow us to see the world and yet only focus on a single detail. When we shoot that focus is on everything. We have a frame or the world and we think we need to look at that entire picture. But in so doing we lost what the artist “saw” while shooting. For me, selective DOF, colour and photoshop do wonders to correct this problem.

  • #78894

    Anonymous

    I have to say, the last one is by far the best. The old adage: “can’t see the forest for the trees” applies quite well when shooting. Our brains are wonderful filters. The allow us to see the world and yet only focus on a single detail. When we shoot that focus is on everything. We have a frame or the world and we think we need to look at that entire picture. But in so doing we lost what the artist “saw” while shooting. For me, selective DOF, colour and photoshop do wonders to correct this problem.

  • #57081

    tom dinning
    Blocked

    There you go, Ash @13ftfall, falling into the trap of ‘best’. Each of these images serves a different purpose, both for the photographer and the viewer. The ‘best-ness’ of the image can only be judged on its effectiveness in serving the purpose of its design. If its desciptive then the first does its job ‘best’. Its not necessarily a great composition or a good aethetic interpretation but it lets us know where we are. What the movie people call an establishment shot.
    The next 2 deal with the detail. Framing within a scene establishes relationships that are difficult to isolate with a broad perspective provided by out brain. The photographer can isolate and do that well as you have said already. The last is an aethetic interpretation where elements of design have been selected to draw out light and form from the landscape. I’m not surprised your preference is to the last. If I were to show these to my sister she would prefer the first. Trust me, I know my sister.
    So, who’s ‘right’ and why the difference?

  • #78895

    tom dinning
    Blocked

    There you go, Ash @13ftfall, falling into the trap of ‘best’. Each of these images serves a different purpose, both for the photographer and the viewer. The ‘best-ness’ of the image can only be judged on its effectiveness in serving the purpose of its design. If its desciptive then the first does its job ‘best’. Its not necessarily a great composition or a good aethetic interpretation but it lets us know where we are. What the movie people call an establishment shot.
    The next 2 deal with the detail. Framing within a scene establishes relationships that are difficult to isolate with a broad perspective provided by out brain. The photographer can isolate and do that well as you have said already. The last is an aethetic interpretation where elements of design have been selected to draw out light and form from the landscape. I’m not surprised your preference is to the last. If I were to show these to my sister she would prefer the first. Trust me, I know my sister.
    So, who’s ‘right’ and why the difference?

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