Building Rapport?

This topic contains 12 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  renee stewart jackson 8 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #43296

    Over the weekend I was lucky enough to visit my sister-in-law who had just had a baby. Of course I took the camera etc and went nuts on taking photos of everyone who would stand still longer than half a second.

    The results got me thinking about building rapport.

    I have spent quite a lot of time with my sister in law cos we flatted together during our uni years. She still comes to stay with us a lot and vice-versa. We’re totally comfortable around each other.

    I haven’t spent a lot of time with her husband. We get on and everything, but the relationship simply isn’t as close.

    This really showed through in the images I took. The photographs I got of her and the baby were natural and I am quite proud of a couple. She was totally relaxed cos she is used to me sticking cameras in people’s faces etc and she is also an artist so she kind of “gets it” anyway. The photos I took of him were ok, but clearly not as good.

    Now some people are going to be naturally relaxed. I don’t think he was.

    So what do you do to get people relaxed in that situation? You have to calm them down and relax them quickly. What do you guys do?

  • #51062

    d_rec
    Participant

    I’m new to Portrait Photography and it’ll take me a little bit of time getting comfortable with directing People into poses and this will show over time. Having people who are experienced in front of a camera does help a great deal and makes it a little easier on me.
    It’s another skill I need to learn and it’ll be interesting looking back in 12 months time and see if I have progressed with my people skills.

  • #72874

    d_rec
    Participant

    I’m new to Portrait Photography and it’ll take me a little bit of time getting comfortable with directing People into poses and this will show over time. Having people who are experienced in front of a camera does help a great deal and makes it a little easier on me.
    It’s another skill I need to learn and it’ll be interesting looking back in 12 months time and see if I have progressed with my people skills.

  • #51063

    Mike
    Participant

    I am going to be starting some portrait photography fairly soon myself. What I plan on doing is starting with people that I know; those who I already have a relationship with and know to some extent. I am thinking that by “studying” them, I might be able to discern their personality types in those that I do not know later. Then again, I might be completely off base. 🙂

  • #72875

    Mike
    Participant

    I am going to be starting some portrait photography fairly soon myself. What I plan on doing is starting with people that I know; those who I already have a relationship with and know to some extent. I am thinking that by “studying” them, I might be able to discern their personality types in those that I do not know later. Then again, I might be completely off base. 🙂

  • #51064

    I am hoping to branch out into this area of photography this year… but I am worried about it for the exact reasons outlined in this thread. I do understand that getting people to relax, and in some cases forget the camera is even there, is one of the keys… my shyness is definitely going to be something I have to work through on this one…

  • #72876

    I am hoping to branch out into this area of photography this year… but I am worried about it for the exact reasons outlined in this thread. I do understand that getting people to relax, and in some cases forget the camera is even there, is one of the keys… my shyness is definitely going to be something I have to work through on this one…

  • #51065

    Glad to know I am not the only one who struggles with this.

    I mean, it’s a lot different when the person isn’t used to being in front of a camera or doesn’t know the photographer too well, so it can really be challenging – especially when there’s a time constraint.

  • #72877

    Glad to know I am not the only one who struggles with this.

    I mean, it’s a lot different when the person isn’t used to being in front of a camera or doesn’t know the photographer too well, so it can really be challenging – especially when there’s a time constraint.

  • #51066

    gone
    Participant

    I am very uncomfortable in front of the camera so am empathetic when others are. I don’t shoot people all that often but when I do and they look uncomfortable, I use the same method I use for pets. I sit on the floor. I don’t know why it is, but it works most of the time and I get some really unique angles.

  • #72878

    gone
    Participant

    I am very uncomfortable in front of the camera so am empathetic when others are. I don’t shoot people all that often but when I do and they look uncomfortable, I use the same method I use for pets. I sit on the floor. I don’t know why it is, but it works most of the time and I get some really unique angles.

  • #51067

    Studies have been done on this. This is an authority/child effect. The person standing or sitting higher takes on a slight edge of authority or superiority. They become the adult, you the child, and they relax for a little play time with baby. This is applicable in many situations. Next time the boss lays into you, have him sit down !

  • #72879

    Studies have been done on this. This is an authority/child effect. The person standing or sitting higher takes on a slight edge of authority or superiority. They become the adult, you the child, and they relax for a little play time with baby. This is applicable in many situations. Next time the boss lays into you, have him sit down !

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