Large format artphotography

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    • #42519
      Richard Dubieniec
      Participant

      I’m hoping to find others with the same interest, challenges, and experience. I work with an Epson 9800 producing prints on watercolour paper up to three metres x one metre+. I hope to learn from others’ experience in everything from optimum high definition capture, through processing and printing; and share interests in creativity in the whole process and outcomes.

    • #44951
      Rich Collins
      Participant

      3meters x 1meter would be 9feet x3feet yes? I have a 30″x60″ printed though not from a 7800/9800 Epson, but from an HP plotter ans the results were absolutely spot on.

      Which camera and model are you using currently? Do you have a favorite application of PP? Mine tend to follow exposure adjustment, contrast, curves, and in some cases White Balance and saturation if needed. For printing I prefer to prints when using Epson printers at no less than 300dpi.

      Pleasure to meet you

    • #66763
      Rich Collins
      Participant

      3meters x 1meter would be 9feet x3feet yes? I have a 30″x60″ printed though not from a 7800/9800 Epson, but from an HP plotter ans the results were absolutely spot on.

      Which camera and model are you using currently? Do you have a favorite application of PP? Mine tend to follow exposure adjustment, contrast, curves, and in some cases White Balance and saturation if needed. For printing I prefer to prints when using Epson printers at no less than 300dpi.

      Pleasure to meet you

    • #44952
      Richard Dubieniec
      Participant

      Hi Rich,

      I use a Canon EOS20 and an EOS550 ( favouring a 60mm Ef-S lens ) and work in full sunlight where posssible. Post op in Photoshop where I adjust levels, and colour, and carefully correct verticals and horizontals ( a particular obsesssion of mine). Printing at 2880 x 1440. Currently looking at HD improvement with bracketed and then merged shots.

    • #66764
      Richard Dubieniec
      Participant

      Hi Rich,

      I use a Canon EOS20 and an EOS550 ( favouring a 60mm Ef-S lens ) and work in full sunlight where posssible. Post op in Photoshop where I adjust levels, and colour, and carefully correct verticals and horizontals ( a particular obsesssion of mine). Printing at 2880 x 1440. Currently looking at HD improvement with bracketed and then merged shots.

    • #44953
      Nicholas Fulford
      Participant

      Ah, and I thought this was going to be about view cameras.

      That said: The big thing about large format prints, (other than cost which can be exorbitant), is resolution with respect to viewing distance. Very high resolution is always desirable but is not always strictly necessary, depending upon how far the viewer is from the subject. A billboard, is usually viewed from a significant distance, and hence may not require ultra-high resolution. A panoramic landscape on the other hand, may be viewed at a quiet close distance, and the viewing of landscapes images is often interesting because of extreme detail in different parts of the image. (But then you can always stitch images together to create giga-pixel landscapes, assuming there is little motion in the areas of interest.)

      I hope that helps.

    • #66765
      Nicholas Fulford
      Participant

      Ah, and I thought this was going to be about view cameras.

      That said: The big thing about large format prints, (other than cost which can be exorbitant), is resolution with respect to viewing distance. Very high resolution is always desirable but is not always strictly necessary, depending upon how far the viewer is from the subject. A billboard, is usually viewed from a significant distance, and hence may not require ultra-high resolution. A panoramic landscape on the other hand, may be viewed at a quiet close distance, and the viewing of landscapes images is often interesting because of extreme detail in different parts of the image. (But then you can always stitch images together to create giga-pixel landscapes, assuming there is little motion in the areas of interest.)

      I hope that helps.

    • #44954
      Richard Dubieniec
      Participant

      Thanks zeroequalsinfinity for your observations.
      I agree. Detail has a fascination in itself but is just one element in the many that might add up to making a compelling image.
      My imagemaking was developed through forty years in fine art, and the opportunity with photography to control the process from capture to print, with freedom to manipulate creatively in between was too good to pass up. The elements – light/colour/texture/etc etc and the medium – ink and paper are concerns for both the painter and photographer. But I still ‘eyeball’ my subjects with quite abstract concerns about the image, and in that respect I’m far more of a painter than a photographer.
      Cost is an issue, but after the initial layout, photography is an inexpensive endeavour. When printing for clients and customers they pay upfront.

    • #66766
      Richard Dubieniec
      Participant

      Thanks zeroequalsinfinity for your observations.
      I agree. Detail has a fascination in itself but is just one element in the many that might add up to making a compelling image.
      My imagemaking was developed through forty years in fine art, and the opportunity with photography to control the process from capture to print, with freedom to manipulate creatively in between was too good to pass up. The elements – light/colour/texture/etc etc and the medium – ink and paper are concerns for both the painter and photographer. But I still ‘eyeball’ my subjects with quite abstract concerns about the image, and in that respect I’m far more of a painter than a photographer.
      Cost is an issue, but after the initial layout, photography is an inexpensive endeavour. When printing for clients and customers they pay upfront.

    • #44955
      Nicholas Fulford
      Participant

      One thing that I am currently investigating is Platinum / Palladium printing. While making large images in this medium would be astronomically expensive, moderate sized images can be made which are not quite so expensive. (I know this is a divergence, but your comments bring to mind that as an artist this medium has something to offer, and especially with respect to light, and texture. If you have ever seen a good platinum print, it has a reach out and touch it quality that is difficult to resist.)

      Two major downs are the cost, and the time required to learn how to calibrate the contact negatives which need to be made to create first rate prints. (One other down is that you need to treat the chemistry with greater care than normal photographic chemistry due to a higher toxicity.) One nice thing is that the emulsion is relatively insensitive to lower spectrum visible light, which means the “dark” room can be lit with tungsten bulbs. Exposure is by U/V lamp contact printing, or you can even use the sun if you want, but exposure control is not as precise.

    • #66767
      Nicholas Fulford
      Participant

      One thing that I am currently investigating is Platinum / Palladium printing. While making large images in this medium would be astronomically expensive, moderate sized images can be made which are not quite so expensive. (I know this is a divergence, but your comments bring to mind that as an artist this medium has something to offer, and especially with respect to light, and texture. If you have ever seen a good platinum print, it has a reach out and touch it quality that is difficult to resist.)

      Two major downs are the cost, and the time required to learn how to calibrate the contact negatives which need to be made to create first rate prints. (One other down is that you need to treat the chemistry with greater care than normal photographic chemistry due to a higher toxicity.) One nice thing is that the emulsion is relatively insensitive to lower spectrum visible light, which means the “dark” room can be lit with tungsten bulbs. Exposure is by U/V lamp contact printing, or you can even use the sun if you want, but exposure control is not as precise.

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