Lighthouses

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This topic contains 114 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  Jeffrey 27 minutes ago.

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  • #341522

    LeanneC
    Participant

    This throwdown was inspired by conversations with Pat Garrett and Albirder on the Weekly Challenge – Something Beginning with M. So, post your lighthouse photographs. And tell us a little about them please.

  • #341525

    LeanneC
    Participant

    I’ll get us started with this beauty: Yaquina Head Lighthouse, in Oregon (near Newport)

    It is the tallest lighthouse in Oregon, at 93 feet.

    Construction started in 1871 and the lighthouse was first lit in 1873.

    It featured in a 2002 movie, The Ring (I have not watched it but may have to now!)

    Here are a few photos from a recent visit:

    Down Here Under the Lighthouse

    Yaquina Head

    Yaquina Lighthouse

    Stand by the Shore

     

    • #341544

      Tobie
      Moderator

      Not only is it a beautiful lighthouse but such a nice spot too Leanne!

      • #341595

        LeanneC
        Participant

        Thanks Tobie. There is a group that works to maintain the site and they have done a wonderful job of looking after it. There is a tidal pool (left foreground in the 2nd photo) that folks can walk down to and explore. And the gray whales were breaching off of the point when we were there.

    • #341579

      Horatio Hadley
      Participant

      Leanne, gorgeous images of a beautiful lighthouse.  All the different viewpoints really give someone an idea of just how important this lighthouse really was.  Thank you so very much.

      • #341596

        LeanneC
        Participant

        Thanks Horatio. It is a well-loved, well maintained lighthouse, for sure. I enjoyed watching the lights at night from our deck where we were staying, nearby. The last shot was actually taken from that deck, with a tripod and long exposure.

    • #342349

      Rob Eyers
      Participant

      This a great throw down Leanne. Lovely images to start it off as well.

  • #341534

    Rob Eyers
    Participant

    All nice images Leanne. I didn’t realize I had so many of these until you posted this throwdown.

    I’ll start with this one of Peggy’s Cove on the coast of Nova Scotia. It has become a major tourist attraction over the years.

    In Sept of 2013 Swiss Air 111 crashed 5 miles off shore and all 229 aboard died.

    Rogue waves have swept tourists off the slippery black rocks and out to sea over the years. There are large yellow signs stating the danger but some still don’t heed the warnings.

    Any time you visit there are hordes of tourists scrambling over the rocks. This image is blended from several to remove them.

    Peggy's Cove Lighthouse.jpg

    • #341545

      Tobie
      Moderator

      Nice one Rob!

    • #341577

      Horatio Hadley
      Participant

      Beautiful Rob!  I just love those two seagulls.  What a great touch.  Thank you.

      • #342346

        Rob Eyers
        Participant

        Thank you Horatio. Since the gulls aren’t tourist I decided they could stay:-)

    • #341592

      LeanneC
      Participant

      It looks so peaceful, Rob. Hard to imagine rogue waves pulling people out to sea. You did a great job blending the shots and removing the people! Beautiful photograph. And thanks for sharing the info.

      • #342347

        Rob Eyers
        Participant

        Thanks Leanne. One of my neighbors lost an acquaintance there so it does happen.

        • #342496

          LeanneC
          Participant

          I am sorry to hear that. So sad.

    • #416673

      Erik Fransman
      Participant

      God shot Rob. Although in this shot I might have cloned out the person and the handrail.

  • #341546

    Tobie
    Moderator

    The Cape Agulhas Lighthouse situated on the southern most tip of Africa. The third lighthouse built in South Africa (1847 at a cost of £15,871) and the second-oldest still in operation (from 1849 onwards).

    27 metres (89 ft) high with a range of 30 nautical miles (56 km or 35 miles).

    Originally, it was fueled by the tail-fat of sheep! 🙂

    Photographed in 2009, long before my DSLR days! 😉

    lighthouse

    • #341578

      Horatio Hadley
      Participant

      T0bie, this is a wonderful lighthouse image.  It is nice to hear that it is still in operation today.  Too many lighthouses have been de-comissioned.  Fueled by tail fat of sheep?  Very interesting.  I would not think that sheep had all that much fat in their tails.  You would think that you would need so much more fat than that.    Thank you for the information as well as the wonderful image.

      • #341825

        Tobie
        Moderator

        I would not think that sheep had all that much fat in their tails

        Thanks Horatio. I think they just had many sheep, LOL!

        Ironically those fatty tails are a delicacy with my ‘boer’ (Afrikaans farmer) cousins today! But not very heart friendly, for obvious reasons! 🙂

    • #341593

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Tobie – what a great shot of a stunning lighthouse! The design is interesting, with the two stone towers on either side. I am with Horatio on the tail fat…I guess you have to use what you have! Thanks for sharing.

      • #341826

        Tobie
        Moderator

        Thanks Leanne! See my reply to Horatio above! 🙂

    • #342350

      Rob Eyers
      Participant

      Solid image Tobie. Is this scanned from a 35mm print? The transition from 35mm certainly was a frustrating process wasn’t it. Early digital was so horrible.

      • #342927

        Tobie
        Moderator

        No Rob, this was straight from a Canon PowerShot S5 IS, from before my DSLR days – and when ‘raw’ still meant ‘uncooked’! 😉

  • #341576

    Horatio Hadley
    Participant

    Leanne, what a brilliant throwdown.  I just love lighthouses.  You have challenged me to dig through all of my images, to find some of the lighthouses I have had the pleasure to visit though the years.  Thank you!!

    • #341594

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Thanks Horatio! Can’t wait to see what you have.

  • #341624

    Fingal Head Lighthouse.

    Fingal Head Lighthouse was erected in 1872 of stone and painted white, the tower had a fixed white light of 1,000 candelas.

    Although the light tower is not high it is built on a low headland. The light is effective as it is built on one of the most easterly points of Australia with plenty of deep water offshore.

    The original kerosene wick burner was converted to automatic acetylene operation in 1920 with an output of 1,500 candelas and altered to group flashing. The one keeper was withdrawn at this time.

    DSC07464

     

    • #341827

      Tobie
      Moderator

      How cute! 🙂

      • #341906

        LeanneC
        Participant

        Tobie said it! Cute describes this light. Really neat setting too.

  • #341625

    Cape Naturaliste Lighthouse

    Cape Naturaliste, in the south west of Western Australia, is the site of a lighthouse which was activated in 1904.[1]

    It is a 20 metres (66 ft) high cylindrical tower built of limestone that still uses its original first order Fresnel lens made by Chance Brothers. The light characteristic is “Fl. (2) 10 s”, i.e. a group of two flashes every ten seconds, the focal plane is at 123 metres (404 ft) above sea level. Another precious lens optic is displayed there, the second order Fresnel lens of the Jarman Island Light, as well as the original Great Sandy Islands beacon. Both items were originally used on the Pilbara coast further north.

    The lighthouse was constructed of limestone quarried from nearby Bunker Bay, which was also known as the “Quarries”.

    DSC09396

     

    • #341828

      Tobie
      Moderator

      Interesting! It reminds me of Nikon only producing their first Fresnel lens recently (300mm f/4). So, it’s actually ancient technology!

      It’s much cheaper, smaller and lighter than the 300mm f/2.8 though.

      • #342353

        Rob Eyers
        Participant

        All through the 90’s the big screen rear projection televisions used Fresnel lenses too Tobie.

    • #341907

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Very cool looking light – love the stone.

  • #341626

    The white queen.

    Originally called Eagles Nest Point, the lighthouse was constructed in 1891. It was converted to automatic operation in 1919.

    The original British-made first order Fresnel lens is still in use.[1] However, the factory in Birmingham, where the lens was built, was bombed during war-time and the essential formula for making the unique lens crystal were lost, should a replacement ever be needed.

    A Japanese firm, consulted by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, estimated the cost of replacing the lens at more than A$1 million.

    Under standard Australian lighthouse convention, red filters would usually be placed to the extreme left and right of the beam (indicating “danger zones” for a passing ship, in-line with the jagged coastline). For reasons unknown, the Split Point Lighthouse operated for many years under the opposite system; although this has now been corrected. Split point lighthouse has 132 stairs from bottom to top and is 34 metres tall.

    This lighthouse was used as a family home to the characters in the Australia Childrens TV series ‘Round the Twist.’

    DSC03948

     

    • #341830

      Tobie
      Moderator

      Nice one David! Lots of distortion introduced by the 10mm f/l but fortunately it did not affect the lighthouse!

  • #341627

    Cape Byron  Lighthouse

    Built at the turn of the 19th century to protect ships passing along the coast, Cape Byron Lighthouse stands resolute on the most easterly point of the Australian mainland. Operated by resident keepers until 1989, its now automated light is clearly visible from Byron Bay township.

    DSC04774

     

    • #341831

      Tobie
      Moderator

      Nice & clean!

  • #341628

    Casuarina Point Lighthouse (with lightpainting)
    The Casuarina Point Lighthouse is located on the Marlston Hill in the city of Bunbury in Western Australia , Australia .

    The first lighthouse was built in 1870 from wood and was only three meters high. It was replaced in 1901 by a makeshift tower, which was manufactured in skeleton construction, which in turn in 1903 had to give way to a 9 m high iron tower. In 1959, the lighthouse was raised by 6 m and then set the lantern. 1970/71, the tower was increased by another 10 m to a total height of 25 m. The lantern and the new section of 1959 were reused.

    The lighthouse firing consists of three white flashes of light, which flash every 2.4 seconds within an interval of 15 seconds.

    DSC09341

  • #341630

    Alcatraz Island Lighthouse

    The first one built on the U.S. West Coast – located on Alcatraz Island in California’s San Francisco Bay. It is located at the southern end of the island near the entrance to the prison.[5] The first light house on the island was completed in 1854, and served the bay during its time as a Citadel and military prison. It was replaced by a taller (95 feet (29 m) above mean sea level) concrete tower built in 1909 to the south of the original one which was demolished after it was damaged due to earthquake in 1906. The automation of the lighthouse with a modern beacon took place in 1963, the year Alcatraz closed as the Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary. It is the oldest light station on the island with a modern beacon and is part of the museum on the island.

    P3260037

     

    • #341833

      Tobie
      Moderator

      Beautiful shots, all of them David! TFS!

    • #341911

      LeanneC
      Participant

      You are a lighthouse collector, David! Beautiful shots and I love the descriptions.

    • #342351

      Rob Eyers
      Participant

      A very nice group of images David. You obviously have an interest in these as well.

       

  • #341819

    Kent DuFault
    Participant

    That’s quite a view.

    This is “Split Rock Lighthouse” it sits on the North Shore of Lake Superior. This view is from the south looking north. From the lighthouse, looking north, there is a point of land about 1/4 of a mile away. Right off of that point lies a shipwreck of a steel freighter. The stern lies in about 30 feet of water and the rest of the hull dives downward to about 160 feet (as memory serves me). When I was 17 years old, I dove that wreck. The water visibility at that time was about 40 feet. I’ll never forget seeing the stern begin to appear out of the shadows. It was really breathtaking. The hull is basically intact except for right in the middle- where it essentially snapped right in half. I’ll also never forget how cold Lake Superior is. Whenever, I go to Split Rock Lighthouse, which is about once a year, I always look out at that point and think about that ship lying under the water right there…

    • #341836

      Tobie
      Moderator

      Nice one Kent! Not the ‘common’ look & feel of lighthouses!

    • #341908

      LeanneC
      Participant

      I agree with Tobie! Not the ‘common’ look. It looks more like a castle tower at a glance. I love the way you shot it, with the colourful vegetation in the foreground wrapping around. And I love the story about the wreck. You were very brave to dive to it.

    • #342355

      Rob Eyers
      Participant

      I love this composition Kent. Your processing gives it an old timey feel which I think works well with the subject matter. The complimentary colours of the vegetation really brings it together. Not big on heavy vignettes but in this case it has a nice quieting effect IMHO.

    • #416674

      Erik Fransman
      Participant

      Very nice atmosphere on this one. And good story/memories.

  • #341841

    Rob Eyers
    Participant

    The light house at Punta Cancun(Cancun Point).

    Mexican beaches are public and federally owned however this lighthouse is difficult to access as it’s hidden behind resort hotels. The point is at the northern tip of the hotel zone.

    Full Moon Cancun 2.jpg

    A long exposure taken on a moonlit night.

    Cancun Lighthouse by full moonlight

    • #341909

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Wow! Amazing shots, Rob! Love the light from the moon and lighthouse in the first one. I hope you have this one hanging up somewhere to enjoy.

      • #342357

        Rob Eyers
        Participant

        Thanks for the wow Leanne. Much appreciated.

    • #341935

      Tobie
      Moderator

      That 1st one is a winner, Rob! Leanne is right – it should be hanging on a wall somewhere in your house!

      • #342365

        Rob Eyers
        Participant

        Thank you Tobie. I do have another from that night hanging. It was a fun night with some good friends so it’s nice to be reminded when I walk by it.

    • #342220

      Kent DuFault
      Participant

      Wow! That is gorgeous! A little compositing going on??? Inquiring minds want to know…

      • #342363

        Rob Eyers
        Participant

        A second wow…my day is made. Thanks Kent.

        So for your inquiring mind(and astute eye)….The first image is a blend from some brackets and yes I sprinkled a few stars in from a different night sky image. The stars are a bit contrived but people seem to like it. 🙂

        • #342441

          Kent DuFault
          Participant

          It’s really nice. Reminds me of a Kincaid painting.

    • #416675

      Erik Fransman
      Participant

      Superior shot Rob! Especially the first one.

  • #341844

    davidc
    Participant

    Hale Lighthouse on the river Mersey. It is now a private house wind farm in the distance.

    Lighthouse at Hale<script async src=”//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js” charset=”utf-8″></script>

    • #341910

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Love the moodiness of this shot, davidc. A contrast to the white lighthouses earlier in the thread. This one feels lonely and sad. But beautiful in its own way.

      • #342033

        davidc
        Participant

        Thanks Leanne. Got there at the right time just before the rain came.

    • #342221

      Kent DuFault
      Participant

      I love the mood of this as well!

    • #342366

      Rob Eyers
      Participant

      Very brooding feel with disaster in the clouds…like it!

    • #416676

      Erik Fransman
      Participant

      Nice mood and good clouds.

  • #341936

    Tobie
    Moderator

    Love the ‘ancient’ feel about it!

    • #342034

      davidc
      Participant

      Thanks Tobie. It about 100 years old built on one that was there for 100 years before.

       

  • #341943

    ElinL
    Participant

    Love this throwdown Leanne – have been following it – fantastic images everyone !

    • #342148

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Aren’t they, Elin? I am blown away. And I love the history that goes along with them. This hasn’t cured my romantic notion of lighthouses…only enhanced!

  • #342149

    LeanneC
    Participant

    Cape Meares (I know Kent has been to visit this one too!), in Oregon, USA

    This light also has a Fresnel lens – made in Paris in 1888 and shipped around the tip of South America to Oregon. The lens has been victim to theft and vandalism. The most recent, occurred in 2010, when the lens was damaged by gunshots. It was estimated to cost $500 000 to repair. The two vandals (who had been drinking and admitted that it was the dumbest thing they had ever done), had to pay $100 000 in damages and spend time in jail – three 16 day jail terms over three years, occurring around the time of the damage. A creative sentence meant to serve as reminder for their “mistake.”

    Cape Meares Light, Oregon

    Cape Meares Light II

    Cape Meares Lighthouse

     

    • #342367

      Rob Eyers
      Participant

      Nice images and an interesting story of how dumb some people can be Leanne.

      • #342497

        LeanneC
        Participant

        For sure! Thanks Rob.

    • #416679

      Erik Fransman
      Participant

      Guns, oh well. (A silly European opinion)

  • #342150

    The Cape Tourville Lighthouse in Tasmania is an unmanned, automatic lighthouse built in 1971 by private contractors (Hurburgh and Olbrich). The road was constructed through virgin eucalypt forest, along with the powerline, with minimal disruption to the National Park. The top of the granite headland was levelled by blasting to provide the base for the light house and parking area.

    This lighthouse was built at the same time as the new lighthouse at Point Home, near Triabunna, to provide better guidance for the bulk carriers carrying wood chips from the Triabunna wood chip mill.

    It replaced the Cape Forestier Lighthouse which had been situated nearby on another headland jutting off the Freycinet Peninsula known as Lemon Rock.

    PA180140

    • #342292

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Very different design. Looks modern.

  • #342151

    Nobbys Head Light is an active lighthouse on Nobbys Head, a headland on the south side of the entrance to Newcastle Harbour, New South Wales, Australia. An image of the lighthouse is included in the Coat of Arms of the City of Newcastle.

    Built in 1858. The lighthouse was designed by Alexander Dawson, the New South Wales Government Architect. The original light had an intensity of 20,000 cd and was attended by three lighthouse keepers.

    In 1934 the light was electrified and automated.

    The current light source is an 120-electronvolt (19 aJ) 1,000-watt (1.3 hp), quartz halogen lamp and the power source is mains electricity with a diesel generator as backup.

    DSC06705

     

    • #342293

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Love the “bridge” behind the lighthouse. The whole thing looks like a ship. Very interesting design.

  • #342225

    Rob Eyers
    Participant

    Cape Saint Vincent Lighthouse is at the furthest southwesterly tip of Europe in the Algarve, Portugal. In the sixteenth century there was a monastery here and the monks maintained a light in the tower for those coming to the cape.

    The first official lighthouse was built here in 1846 and after years of decay was rebuilt starting in 1897 and finished in 1908. The reconstruction installed a Fresnel lens which replaced the third order reflection type that had previously been installed. The lens is 1330mm and is one of the 10 largest in the world consisting of 3 panels 8 square meters 3.58 meters high. There are only 9 Fresnel optical devices that operate worldwide. At a height of 28 meters it’s light can be seen for 32 miles.

    Rob Eyers_0117 lab sharpened cropped large.jpg

    And a closer look.

    Rob Eyers_0117 lab sharpened cropped smaller.jpg

    • #342294

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Beautiful light, beautifully captured, Rob.

  • #342286

    Robert Apple
    Moderator

    Lots of really nice photos here. Great Throw Down. Wish we had a light house or 2 in Wyoming.

  • #342637

    bucweeet
    Participant

    As most have said already… a lot of reallly nice lighthouse images!

    From modern to really old… here’s some images from a few of the lighthouses I’ve encountered while travelling.

    The most ‘modern’ lighthouse image I have. Taken just prior to entering Paradise Bay, Antarctica

    _UC_1711

    Navigational Lighthouses in Beagle Channel Argentina

    _UCW5845

    _UCW5272

    _UCW5242

    Faro de Les Eclaireurs – Beagle Channel

    Les Eclaireurs Lighthouse (the French name “Les Éclaireurs” means “the Scouts”) is a slightly conically shaped lighthouse standing on the northeastern-most island of the five or more Les Eclaireurs islands, which it takes its name from, 5 nautical mile east of Ushuaia in the Beagle Channel, Tierra del Fuego, southern Argentina.

    The brick-built tower is 11 metres (36 ft) high and 3 metres (10 ft) wide at the base, with its windowless wall painted red-white-red and topped by a black lantern housing and gallery. Only a door pointing to the west provides access to the building. The light is 22.5 metres (74 ft) above sea level emitting white flashes every ten seconds with a range of 7.5 nautical miles (13.9 km). The lighthouse is still in operation, is remote-controlled, automated, uninhabited and is not open to the public, guarding the sea entrance to Ushuaia. Electricity is supplied by solar-panels. The lighthouse was put into service on December 23, 1920.

    _UC_9604

    and a “slightly” different view of it…

    _UC_9846

    Entering the Harbour into Venice

    The Punta Sabbioni lighthouse, a landmark for passing tourists and for the boats heading toward Venice’s lagoon. The original lighthouse is made of a metal, pagoda-shaped structure, painted in a black and white check. Rising to a height of 26 meters, it was built in reinforced concrete. The pagoda structure took 28 years to build, with work starting in 1882 and ending in1910.

    _MG_7000

    Istanbul Harbour – guiding the ferries in (my apologies, hard to find info on this specific lighthouse)

    _MG_3500

    Castle Breakwater – Guernsey England

    The lighthouse – used as an aid to shipping, has a focal plane height of 14m above Mean High Water Springs (MHWS), and a range of 16NM (easily seen on clear evenings on rounding Corbiere Point in Jersey). It has a continuous light showing white for 7.5 seconds and red for 2.5 seconds, and a 12m (40 ft) round granite tower with lantern and gallery. During restricted visibility, a horn is sounded once every 15s to assist vessels in restricted visibility – activated manually by Guernsey Port Control.

    bucweeet - Guernsey, England 179-Edit

    North Pier Light – Duluth Lake Superior Locks

    On the north breakwater at the entrance to the Duluth Ship Canal. An 1896 project to improve harbor facilities resulted in the reconstruction of the sides of the
    ship canal, bracketing it in the two concrete piers which define its channel to the present.[3]  While the south pier had been equipped with a light from 1874, the north pier was unlit, and given the difficult approach (highlighted by the notorious wreck of the SS Mataafa in 1905), calls for aids were soon made. in 1909, a tower was erected on the North Pier and lit the following year.

    _UC_8823

    A different view of the Lighthouse (it’s just right of the building/lighthouse on the south pier)

    _UC_8672

    Cape Enrage New Brunswick – Bay of Fundy

    Cape Enrage derives its name from the large reef that extends south into Chignecto Bay, which causes the water off the point to become extremely violent, particularly at half tide when the reef is partially exposed and the water is moving quickly.

    Dating from 1838, it is the oldest lighthouse on the New Brunswick, Canada mainland. The lighthouse itself has been automated and unmanned since the 1980s,

    _UC_7961

    Ram Island Ledge Light Portland Maine

    The Ram Island Ledges are a series of stone ledges, some of which break the waters at the southern end of Casco Bay, a short way south of Cushing Island. In 1855 an iron spindle was erected to protect sailors from these dangerous underwater ledges. The ledge continued to be the site of repeated shipwrecks.

    Construction began on May 1, 1903 and was completed in 1905. It is a twin of the Graves Light off Boston. The lighthouse was built of granite quarried from Vinalhaven, Maine. The lighthouse originally included a third-order Fresnel lens. The lighthouse was electrified in 1958, and then automated in 1959. The light was converted to solar power in January 2001. The Ram Island Ledge Light was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Ram Island Ledge Light Station on March 14, 1988, reference number 88000157.[3]

    _UC_7387-Edit

    Portland Head Light – Fort Williams Park – Portland Maine

    Construction began in 1787 at the directive of George Washington, and was completed on January 10, 1791 using a fund of $1,500, established by him. Whale oil lamps were originally used for illumination. In 1855, following formation of the Lighthouse Board, a fourth-order Fresnel lens was installed; that lens was replaced by a second-order Fresnel lens, which was replaced later by an aero beacon in 1958. That lens was updated with an DCB-224 aero beacon in 1991.

    The station has changed little except for the rebuilding of the whistle house in 1975 due to it being badly damaged in a storm. Today, Portland Head Light stands 80 feet (24 m) above ground and 101 feet (31 m) above water, its white conical tower being connected with a dwelling. The 224 airport style aerobeacon is visible for 24 nautical miles (44 km; 28 mi). The 400 watt metal halide lamp is rated for 20,000 hours and produces 36,000 lumens of light at 200,000 candlepower.

    _UC_7354-Edit

    • #342918

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Wow bucweeet. That is a lot of lighthouses – old and new, big and small. I really like the Guernsey Light in b&w. And the shot of the North Pier light, with the reflection, is great too. “Cape Enrage” – what a name! Reminded me of “Cape Foulweather” in Oregon. Might as well call them as we see them!

      Thanks for sharing all your lovely photos. I enjoyed the history and lighthouse info that you included.

  • #343005

    bucweeet
    Participant

    Thanx Leanne. for both the comment and posting this throwdown.  It brought back a lot memories both finding the images and doing the research.

  • #348755

    Frogdaily
    Participant

    What a great thread! Love all the Lighthouse photos!

    This is Battery Point Lighthouse in Crescent City California:

    Battery Point Lighthouse

    Battery Point Lighthouse was built in 1855 in a Cape Cod style, with a central brick tower protruding from the roof of a one-and-a-half-story stone keeper’s dwelling. The fourth-order Fresnel lens in the lantern room first illuminated the night sky at Crescent City California on December 10, 1856.

    The Crescent City Lighthouse was automated in 1953, and a modern 375mm lens replaced the fourth-order Fresnel lens. After automation, the Del Norte Historical Society leased the lighthouse, and the lighthouse eventually became home to a museum and curators.

    Remarkably, the lighthouse was not harmed when Crescent City received the worst tsunami damage ever suffered along the west coast of the lower forty-eight states. On March 27, 1964, the strongest earthquake ever recorded in the northern hemisphere struck Alaska near Prince William Sound, generating a series of waves that raced south at a speed of nearly 600 mph. The waves reached Crescent City around midnight with crests of up to twenty feet.

    The lighthouse survived the ordeal intact, but the following year, the modern beacon that replaced the Fresnel lens in the tower was switched off, and a flashing light at the end of the nearby breakwater served as the harbor’s navigational aid. On December 10, 1982, the light in the lighthouse tower was lit again, as Battery Point Lighthouse became a private aid to navigation.

    Today, caretakers live in the lighthouse and conduct tours of the premises. The fourth-order Fresnel lens used in the lighthouse is on display along with historic photos and other lighthouse memorabilia.

    • #349013

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Beautiful Frog! I guess those lights are made to withstand all kinds of weather. But a tsunami – that is impressive! I think when I retire I would like to be a lighthouse caretaker. Except, no tours! I would just hermit-ize myself! Must be nearing the end of the school year to be thinking this way. LOL

      • #349046

        Frogdaily
        Participant

        Thank you so much Leanne … after hearing of the terrifying experience the caretakers had when the tsunami hit, I don’t think I would want to be a caretaker …lol

  • #353704

    Pamela Winter
    Participant

    Turkey Point Lighthouse – Chesapeake Bay, Maryland

    Built in 1833, Turkey Point Lighthouse sits on a 100 foot high bluff that overlooks the union of the Elk River and the Chesapeake Bay. At 129 feet above the water, Turkey Point Lighthouse is the third tallest light on the Bay after the lighthouses at Cape Charles (191 feet) and Cape Henry (164 feet) at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay in Virginia.
    Turkey Point Lighthouse was built and modeled after Concord Point Lighthouse, which is located across the Chesapeake Bay at the mouth of the Susquehanna River in Havre de Grace. Both lighthouses were built by John Donahoo, however, Turkey Point is brick and Concord Point is granite.
    The lighthouse was very important for mariners as it marked the shipping channel’s change in course from the Chesapeake Bay east to the Elk River, and eventually to the Chesapeake & Delaware (C&D) Canal.
    Eleven wicks and reflectors were used for illumination, until 1855 when a Fourth Order Fresnel Lens with a single lamp was imported from France and installed. The lighthouse was electrified in 1943, at which time a 100 watt bulb, in combination with the lens, produced 680 candlepower of light.
    In 1948 Fannie Mae Salter retired, making her the last lighthouse keeper of Turkey Point and the last female lighthouse keeper on the Chesapeake Bay. Turkey Point holds the distinction of having more female keepers (four) than any other lighthouse on the Chesapeake Bay.
    In 2000 the Turkey Point Lighthouse was decommissioned and the maintenance of the structure was taken over by the non-profit organization Turkey Point Light Station (TPLS) Inc.
    On December 2, 2002 Turkey Point Light Station was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
    In 2006, ownership of the lighthouse was transferred to Maryland Department of Natural Resources from the Federal Government.

    • #353733

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Nice shot of a nice looking light, Pamela. That is interesting, about the female keepers. I wonder, would they have been single women? That is somewhat surprising and sounds like the makings of a good novel. I want to know more!

  • #353859

    Pamela Winter
    Participant

    Daniel K. Inouye Kilauea Point Lighthouse – Kauai, Hawaii

    Perched at the northernmost tip of Kauai, the 52-foot Daniel K. Inouye Kilauea Point Lighthouse was built in 1913 as a beacon for traveling ships. Although its light was turned off in the 1970s and has been replaced by an automatic beacon, it still serves as one of the island’s most frequented attractions.

    The view off the rugged northern coastline and the deep-blue Pacific makes this the perfect vantage point for photos. This is also the location of the Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge, a sanctuary for seabirds. Signage throughout the refuge identifies the area’s bird species, including frigates, shearwaters, boobies and Laysan albatrosses nesting on the property. You’ll see them soar the skies above the refuge, many landing on a small nearby island covered in birds. During December through May, you may even catch a glimpse of humpback whales. This scenic peninsula, 200-feet above sea level, is a must-see on your visit to the North Shore.

    • #354135

      LeanneC
      Participant

      What a great shot, Pamela. The colours are stunning. I love how you can see two distinct blues in the ocean. And I see a couple of your seabirds above the lighthouse!

      • #354168

        Pamela Winter
        Participant

        Thanks! I was timing my shot to catch the waves breaking against the cliff. I was lucky with the seabirds.

  • #408135

    ElinL
    Participant

    Reykjanes lighthouse

     

    Reykjanes lighthouse

    Reykjanesviti is the oldest lighthouse in Iceland, located on the tip of the Reykjanes Peninsula. First build in 1878, although it was damaged beyond repair just eight years later following a major earthquake. The current building was raised in 1907–1908 and, save from having gas installed in 1929, has remained little-changed since.

    Due to the erosion of the cliff on which it stands, however, it is expected that a new building will be needed in the next few years. Reykjanesviti is within sight of the geothermal area Gunnuhver,  which holds the largest mud pot in Iceland. The white “clouds” are steam from the Gunnuhver geyser. This area has a fascinating folklore, said to be the eternal prison of a ghost who terrorised the Reykjanes Peninsula.

    • #408161

      Rob Eyers
      Participant

      I like this one Elin. The white clouds add a lot.

    • #409007

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Tried commenting a few days ago but had some technical issues. This is really interesting, Elin – the background and the image. I can’t help but wonder where the ocean is in this image. Just over the hill that the lighthouse sits on? The water vapour gives it a very moody feel – fitting for a ghost story!

  • #408146

    Dorothy
    Participant

    WOW!  Absolutely amazing lighthouses and history.  Wish i had been more into photography when i lived on the east coast, there are so many lighthouses along the Massachusetts coast where i spent a lot of time.  Living in Missouri, kind of hard to find a lighthouse these days. 🙂

    Again, great throw down, awesome lighthouses everybody!

  • #408182

    Wadjemup Lighthouse, Rottnest Island (Western Australia)

    Completed in 1849, the original 20-metre (66 ft) Wadjemup Lighthouse (also known as Rottnest Island Light Station) was Western Australia’s first stone lighthouse and was built to provide a safer sailing passage for ships to Fremantle Port and the Swan River Colony.

    A second and larger replacement tower was built on the same site in 1896. It is the fourth oldest extant lighthouse in Western Australia and was Australia’s first rotating beam lighthouse. A shipwreck which was partly caused by poor communications and misunderstood signals from the lighthouse prompted the construction of another lighthouse on the island in 1900.

    PC072493

    • #409008

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Love those blue skies with the white, white tower. A beautiful image, David. Hard to imagine how they built it so straight and tall, using stone. I bet that was quite a process!

  • #408183

    Bathurst Lighthouse is the second two lighthouses on Rottnest Island, the other being Wadjemup Lighthouse (Above). It is located on Bathurst Point, in the north east of the island, and was activated in 1900. The lighthouse was erected in response to a series of shipping disasters in the area, which included the loss of the City of York in 1899.

    The lightsource and lantern house were originally to be used at Cape Leeuwin but were then built in on Rottnest Island. In 1920 the original acetylene flame was replaced by a flasher, which made the keeper superfluous. An electric light was installed in 1986.

    Bathurst Lighthouse serves as the rear light in the pair of Kingston Reef’s leading lights, which guide ships departing from Fremantle through the reefs near the island. Its light is characterised by a group of four flashes that occurs every sixteen seconds.

    PC072200

    PC072214

     

    • #417118

      Jeffrey
      Participant

      Your use of leading lines in the second shot in very interesting

      you have done well

      nice images

  • #409009

    LeanneC
    Participant

    Lovely images again, David. A lighthouse without a keeper seems a sad thing to me.

  • #409012

    LeanneC
    Participant

    Amphitrite (named after the wife of Poseidon) Lighthouse, near Ucluelet, on the wild Pacific west coast of British Columbia.

    The lighthouse, built in 1915, was designed to withstand gale-force winds and tidal waves. I have seen some lighthouses that I would consider quite beautiful but the word that comes to mind when looking at this one is “tough.”

    Amphitrite Lighthouse

  • #409015

    LeanneC
    Participant

    One more of Amphitrite Lighthouse:

    Tough, not Beautiful

  • #416672

    Erik Fransman
    Participant

    Especially the last one, very nice!

  • #416680

    Erik Fransman
    Participant

    Paard van Marken, The Netherlands
    Click for Flickr, bigger.
    Light house in snow

    • #416837

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Love the placement of the lighthouse with the sea ice in the foreground. Really shows the elements that this lighthouse has to withstand. Great image, Erik.

  • #416682

    Erik Fransman
    Participant

    Paard van Marken, The Netherlands. Ice and water.
    Click for Flickr, bigger.
    Ice and Water

    • #416838

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Gorgeous image! Everything leads your eye to the lighthouse.

  • #416683

    Erik Fransman
    Participant

    One more, same lighthouse, Paard van Marken, The Netherlands. Click for Flickr, Bigger.
    The lighthouse "Het Paard van Marken" in Winter

  • #416684

    Erik Fransman
    Participant

    Lighthouse Urk, The Netherlands. If memory serves me well, it won POTW august 2016. Please Click for bigger, Flickr:
    Lighthouse, Urk, The Netherlands

    • #416839

      LeanneC
      Participant

      Quite a contrast to the other photos! Love the activities on the grass that you captured.

  • #416686

    Erik Fransman
    Participant

    Not sure the lighthouse wins here from the car, My wife’s Citroën DS. Analogue Picture. As usual, click for bigger, is better.

    • #416840

      LeanneC
      Participant

      The car has a slight edge in my mind 😉 Very nice.

      • #417040

        Erik Fransman
        Participant

        Thanks Leanne for all the comments. Yeah, the DS wins. Was such a special car.

  • #417117

    Jeffrey
    Participant

    Castle Hill Lighthouse opened 1890  and is located on Narragansett Bay in Newport, Rhode Island at the end of the historic Ocean Drive. It is an active navigation aid for vessels entering the East Passage, between Conanicut Island and Aquidneck Island.

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