Need CC please

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    • #416235
      Jay Ward
      Participant

      I’m trying my hand at landscape for the first time in quite a while. CC appreciated.

      D7200, six bracketed exposures. ISO 100, 1/5 sec avg. f11, 10mm.Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Japanese garden

      • This topic was modified 4 months ago by Jay Ward.
    • #416261
      Steve Walker
      Participant

      The first thing that catches my eye is the path on the left and how it appears to slope off the frame. This could be a natural feature but it suggests to me lens distortion, not surprising at 10mm. The second thing I notice is the glow and tone change in the blue sky just to the left of the clouds. It makes me wonder about that color shift rather than appreciate the fluffy clouds against the brilliant blue summer sky. This may be the result of a 5 frame blend. I can’t do that very well so don’t know if it can be changed.

      To my taste, the frame has an awful lot of dirt. It seems to dominate the scene along with the large bushes. For me, the fence also isn’t an attractive feature.

      I think the image would have worked better by taking a couple of steps to the right, getting lower, using the path as the main character. I would (possibly, depending on what is outside the frame) have placed the left curb of the lane at the bottom left corner of the frame and allowed the large bushes to frame the image on the right. That might give the path more prominence as a place to wander (a leading line) and eliminated the fence and dirt on the right of the frame.

      Of course, I have no idea what obstacles might have been in place to prevent any of what I think I would have done, so your mileage may vary…

    • #416269
      Petr Nowak
      Participant

      I like the bushes in the center of image. You probably step as close as possible to bushes with your ultra-wide lens.

      The place offers a lot of interesting elements in general (the tree with red flowers, other interesting trees, bushes). However the iron fence really isn’t attractive. And the path on the left too (although it forms interesting slope). I’d try to find other place without man made structures (nature only).

      I can’t comment on technical issues concerning 5 frames blending too much because i don’t have any experience. It could be tricky to avoid some blending artifacts. Depends on used method.

      I second Steves idea of using the path as the main character.

    • #416272
      Jay Ward
      Participant

      Thanks for the suggestions, both of you. Yes the 10mm does distort the path, I tried to correct for that in the edit below. The blue sky was a bit oversaturated, I pulled that back some.  The fence is made from the bamboo you see growing in the center. I have the blisters to show for the lashings holding it together :-). It is a bit busy. Thanks again for taking the time.

      • This reply was modified 4 months ago by Jay Ward.
      • #416286
        Graham Hart
        Participant

        I agree with Frank here. Several random elements but no real subject matter. The visual weight of the path on the left makes my brain think the image is tilted to the left (perhaps it is?). It feels like an attempt to include the path and the fence in the same shot which end up in a conflict for attention given the lack of any real focus point.

        Also, drawing a diagonal line from bottom left to top right, everything above that line is out of focus and everything below it is in focus. This could be due to the bracketing or maybe a gust of wind during shooting causing movement?

        For mine, if I had built an excellent fence from raw materials on-site as you have done Jay I would more likely get closer to the detail. Perhaps a shot with more perspective on the fence as a leading line toward the bamboo in the background. Easy to say I know without knowing the lay of the land and if such a shot is possible given the terrain.

    • #416274
      Frank
      Participant

      Before taking the shot, ask yourself, “What is the subject?”     For example, “”what is your subject here?” !!  I see lots of points of interest: a pathway  curving off into the distance, a wooden fence,  green bushes, trees, something red in the tree on the left side, but what is the main subject?  It is not obvious to me.  Pick something within  the scene that your really want to emphasize and show off to the viewer.  Be sure someone looking for the first time knows what you want that viewer to see.  Make it obvious. You have too many options here.  The road curves off to the left, the fence cuts across the middle, big bushes are near the front,  is the sky important?   What if there was no sky?etc….etc….  What is the most important part of the scene for you?

      • This reply was modified 4 months ago by Frank.
    • #416308
      Jay Ward
      Participant

      I’ve been shooting macros for so long, I kind of went too far the other way with the landscape. Thanks for the input everyone.

    • #416320
      Frank
      Participant

      I just read something in an article from this website concerning tips for seascapes, since you are a macro guy turning to landscapes, this quote might resonate with you, and apply it to landscapes without getting as close as macro.  “Instead of shooting an entire scene, introduce some variety into your seascape photographs and get closer to your subject – you may end up with truly creative results!”    ( I do like  all the green in your image)

    • #416326
      Jay Ward
      Participant

      Here’s the same path from the other direction. One shot, still pretty busy.

      • #416530
        Steve Walker
        Participant

        I like this view much more. There are lts of elements but, for me, are more interesting. My brain reduces the “lots” to a few because they are similar or of a type. The largest bush is viewed as one green thing and sort of blends in with other green things, esp since they overlap. At least that is how my mind seems to work. Others perceive differently.

    • #416335
      Rob Eyers
      Participant

      Hi Jay. My advice would be to first tighten the crop up. Remove everything except what is not needed. After that I would tone down the saturation and brighten it up. I think this one has good bones. Something in this direction maybe.

    • #416338
      Jay Ward
      Participant

      I like it.

       

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