Passo Giau, Italian Dolomites

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This topic contains 16 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  Graham Hart 5 days, 6 hours ago.

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  • #413938

    Erik Fransman
    Participant

    This is a 6 image pano. I wanted to give it a 1950’s 70mm Technicolor look.
    Please click for bigger. Bigger is a must.
    Passo Giau, Italian Dolomites

  • #413973

    Dorothy
    Participant

    Breathtaking Erik! The larger view is a definite must. Fantastic view but then to see the buildings and dirt roads so far out is just cool. The colors came out perfect. Is that a ski resort up on the top right? Seriously, there is so much to see and i am glad you said go bigger otherwise the Italian Dolomites would have been all i noticed.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 1 day ago by  Dorothy.
    • #414054

      Erik Fransman
      Participant

      Dorothy, yes that is a Ski resort. It must be great there in winter but I have never been there in winter. (one less expensive hobby… ๐Ÿ™‚ )

  • #413983

    JasenkaG
    Keymaster

    Great colors indeed ๐Ÿ™‚ Now I’ll have to read more about Technicolor, I’ve never paid any closer attention to that.

  • #413999

    Robert Apple
    Moderator

    I think you succeed in the color Scheme Erik. Reminds me of some of the early westerns shot in technicolor.

  • #414004

    Steve Walker
    Participant

    Canโ€™t remember seeing so much green in these mountains, even during the Giro in May. Stunning technicolor.

  • #414009

    Tersha
    Keymaster

    Wow Erik, I just looked on Flickr, and I could ‘feel’ the brightness and the colours, wonderful image!

  • #414011

    Dahlia Ambrose
    Keymaster

    Wow! Love the landscape and the choice of colours Erik ๐Ÿ™‚

  • #414021

    Erik Fransman
    Participant

    Thank you all.

    Jasenka, Technicolor was an enormously difficult and elaborate process used in motion picture films. Instead of one color negative, they used three black and white negatives that were exposed simultaneously. The light behind the lens was split by a three-way prism and each B&W negative recorded a separate part of the color scheme, Red, Green and Blue. The cameras were so enormous that it is almost incomprehensible that they were able to pull it off. But the end result was always mind-blowing, I especially like the landscape scenes in technicolor.

    I believe they used the three stip technicolor cameras till 1954 although many years later, the Godfather IIย was the last American film to be printed in dye-transfer Technicolor.

    Take a look at these clips: (And never complain again about the size and weight of your full frame body and lenses! ๐Ÿ™‚ย  )

     

     

    • #414041

      Graham Hart
      Participant

      Terrific picture Erik and when clicked for bigger I immediately thought of that James Bond film Moonraker with Jaws and the ski-lift fight scene. I don’t think this was shot in technicolour but the wide angle scene of verdant green fields and the mountain peaks reminded me of it.

      Fascinating videos too. Gives one a greater understanding of what you did to create your pic.

      • #414055

        Erik Fransman
        Participant

        Graham, obviously I did not create my pic in three-strip Technicolor, I just tried to recreate the look in the post. As far as I know, Moorraker was shot on regular 35mm and printed in Technicolor.

        • #414197

          Graham Hart
          Participant

          “I don’t think this was shot in Technicolour”…..was referring to the film Erik. Apparently it was in Eastman Colour according to Dr. Google? I was admiring your attempt to recreate the look which reminded me of the scenery in the film even though it wasn’t shot in the Dolomites ๐Ÿ™‚

  • #414062

    Rob Eyers
    Participant

    Very interesting post Erik. Beautiful scenery skillfully captured (handheld?) and processed. It does have a technicolorish look but it also seems to have a Fuji color component.

    Can I ask how you adjusted the colour? Seems like some curve adjustments in Lab may have been used.

    • #414164

      Erik Fransman
      Participant

      Hi Rob, yes this was handheld.
      In processing, I kept the color as shot, added some contrast, set my white and black point (left the white as is and pulled back on the black level a bit). Then I added some vibrance.

      I applied a solid 85 filter but the opacity about 40% and added a polarizer opacity 70%.
      I also added a slight vignette.

  • #414076

    John Thompson
    Moderator

    Very nice Erik.ย  I did not know the elaborate process of Technicolor.ย  I remember watching movies in the 50’s with this process but did not know the amount of work required to pull it off.ย  I have been working on Kodak Aerochrome look to my IR images.ย  I have the process down now I have to take better pics.

  • #414094

    beth
    Participant

    the mountains are gorgeous and the comp. works really well with the road acting as a lead in.

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