Rain Chain.

This topic contains 11 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Dave Watkins 6 months, 3 weeks ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #381502

    Dave Watkins
    Participant

    f/2.8, 1/200, 1250 ISO.

    Have tried a number of times to get a nice shot of our new copper rain chain. The company that makes them “ages” them to give them a more colorful look. After a dozen or so attempts I’m looking for some feed back from other light stalkers.

    This is the best I’ve come up with so far and I’m reasonably happy with it but I think it could be better.

    I’ve filled the frame with one “bucket.” I’ve stood back and have shown 6 or 7 buckets. I’ve used faster shutter speeds to freeze the water droplets.

    More often than not when it’s raining  the wind is blowing as well. Slower shutter speeds to soften the water drops result in out of focus chain because it’s swinging in the wind.

    My question is if you had this in your yard how would you go about getting an image you’d be happy with?

  • #381555

    John Thompson
    Moderator

    I think I would stop your camera down to get more of the chain in focus.  Your focus point here is to small.  I would also experiment with long shutter speeds to depict a steady water stream in lieu of the drops pictured here.

    • #381560

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Thanks for your feedback John. I’m going to try again when there is less wind so I can use longer shutter speeds and smaller aperture for more  DOF. Yesterday 1/200 was about as slow as I could go to not have a blurry chain from it swinging in the wind. Looking back I should have increased ISO and dealt with any noise in PP.

      I think you’re absolutely right. More of the chain in focus and stream of water instead of drops would make a better image.

  • #381571

    Lenny Wollitz
    Participant

    A fun idea and I like the lighting!  What John said.  I would try blocking the wind or just bring it inside and use a tripod and be able to experiment with shutter speed and aperture.

    • #381575

      John Thompson
      Moderator

      Thats a  good idea Lenny.

    • #381586

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Unfortunately this would be a little unpractical. It’s screwed to the gutter and is 8 1/2 feet long. But I appreciate you throwing out some ideas. Thank you.

  • #381580

    Rob Eyers
    Participant

    Does it need to be windy and raining out Dave?….I mean couldn’t you just use a garden hose to sprinkle it on a calm day.

    I agree with a smaller aperture to have more of it in focus. You could also use slow and fast shutter speeds for different images and try some blending in PS to create something unusual. Just make sure your exposures are the same by adjusting your ISO.

    I would also make sure the background is far away so that you mantain that nice bokeh after shutting down your aperture.

     

    • #381587

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Now this could work. I could clamp a garden hose to the gutter and do this on a sunny, calm day. Sunshine would allow me to use more “friendly” exposure settings. Thanks Rob.  🙂

  • #381604

    Anne Hornsby
    Participant

    I really like this effort, Dave.  And everyone’s suggestions are super helpful  — for me, too, as I’m beginning to try compositions like this, and struggle to get more in focus.  I wonder if it would be better to see all 3 containers, so you could add distance from the chain?   The colors and textures on the top “bucket” are great.

    • #381647

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Thanks Anne. Since this rain chain is only about ten feet away from our front door I have ample opportunities to try lots of different angles, viewpoints, lenses, settings etc. etc. I know there’s a really nice shot to be had here. And eventually I’ll find it. 🙂

  • #381609

    Graham Hart
    Participant

    Interesting. I was having a conversation just yesteday with my brother-in-law about focus stacking and how I’m keen to try it. He is a purist and doesn’t believe in PP in any way whatsoever. He insists that if you can’t get the shot you want with a single click, then it’s not worth having. He said that there is absolutely no advantage in focus stacking over a well taken single shot with adequate DOF set properly if the lens is of good enough quality.

    This might be a perfect example of the benefits of focus stacking. Yes, there would have to be no wind but with the POV you have in your shot above, three or four shots with each bucket in focus and a wide open aperture for the background bokeh effect and then a finishing shot with the cascading water taken separately, possibly at a lower shutter speed for the silky effect, then finally all merged in PP. Don’t know if it would actually work but might be worth a try? The experts out there can probably nix the idea fairly quickly if its not practical?

    • #381649

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Thanks for the feedback Graham. I’m somewhat in your brother-in-laws corner only because as of now my post processing skills are severely lacking.  But following your idea would be a great opportunity to learn a new technique. Never hurts to try.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.