Rock Cairns.

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    • #428048
      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Rob Eyers suggested this may make for a good throw down. I agree. Jasenka and Dahlia both mentioned that they have seen them so I don’t think it’s a stretch to think other Light Stalkers have come across them as well.

      I googled rock stacking and found it’s a fairly common practice throughout the world for various reasons. I did read one person’s view that it equates to graffiti in the wilderness and that it speeds up the erosion process. Personally I see no harm in it. But to each his own.

      I’m starting with the same shot I posted in Chit Chat. Will look at the others I took that day and see if there’s another decent shot to post here. Looking forward to seeing any other rock stacking images you have.

    • #428152
      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      I’m not sure where that halo, or whatever you’d call it, around the stack on the right came from. I didn’t do any dodging. Anyway here’s another.

    • #428156
      Rob Eyers
      Participant

      I’m not sure what has caused the halo Dave. Here’s a quick fix you can use to get rid of it though if you’re using PS.

      Select the clone stamp. In the tool bar at the top set the mode to DARKEN. Set the opacity and flow to 30% or so. Sample outside of the halo and paint over the halo. Don’t worry too much about painting over the rock as it is already dark.

      It’s a simple fix but it can really save your bacon sometimes. This took less than a minute.

      I’m pretty sure I have some stacked rocks but they’re way back in the archives. I’ll see if I can dig them out. Cheers

    • #428163
      Rob Eyers
      Participant

      Rocks stacked to look like a human substitute have been used in the Canadian arctic for a long time. They’re called INUKSUK by the Inuit people who live in Nunavut which is a northern territory of Canada.

      These days the Inuksuk is a symbol of our indigenous heritage and of Canada. You can find small versions of them almost anywhere there are rocks to pile up. Their original use was much more serious and was a key to survival in the north.

    • #428202
      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Thanks for the tip Rob. Never even thought about using a clone stamp for a fix there. I’ve got a lot to learn.

      Interesting back ground story. Thanks for sharing that. The shape of a human form is unmistakable in the shadow. The late afternoon (early morning?) light shows off the colors and textures of the rocks wonderfully.

    • #428342
      Joanna
      Participant

      Such beautiful, soft colours, Dave!
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      • This reply was modified 4mo, 3wk ago by Joanna.
    • #428356
      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Thanks for the comment Joanna.  🙂

    • #428637
      DaveGillespie
      Participant

      I came across this one in Manning Park, BC

    • #428666
      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Thanks for the contribution Dave. It’s kind of fun coming across these while out and about. 🙂 I’ve been playing with B&W more myself recently.

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