Springtime Desert

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Frank 4 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #402253

    Michael
    Participant

    Springtime Desert

  • #402262

    Frank
    Participant

    Hi Michael, I like the curving lines of the tree trunks with their shadows and the yellows and greens, but….I think the bright sky of the upper right corner i  s hurting the image, and that partial tree trunk needs to be cloned out.  You could crop it out, but you might not want the rest of the image to go down from the top.  Over on the left there seem to be a touch of blue sky that would have been a much better color to include with the yellows.  In short, I would have tried not to include any white sky in the composition.

    Here is a few edits using sliders in ACR. (which are the same in Lightroom)  Move the white all the way over to get rid of the overexposed are of sky in that blown out corner.

    Next play with the color sliders both in basics and also in HSL/Saturation to bring out the yellows (some bushes turned orange) and then the greens.   By coincidence I mentioned in another comment to one of your images, the RGB sliders in “Camera Calibration”.   Play with these to see how the colors are effected.  I found by increasing the red saturation slider, moving it right, that effected the greens and yellows, too.  I really do not see red except maybe in the soil.

    In short, remember that our eyes are drawn to the brightest part of an image, so beware of bright grey/white skies that have no detail.  Keep looking for those desert colors!

  • #402292

    Michael
    Participant

    Thank you very much for your critique and your help with my Lightroom learning curve. I appreciate it a lot!

  • #402314

    billyspad
    Blocked

    Michael I think its one of those scenes that hit your senses when you saw it and then your camera failed miserably in an attempt to capture what you felt and saw. Camera sensors are incredibly crude compared to the human eye and if you add to that fact that a camera cannot capture feelings then what often happens is we all end up with a bland picture. I looked at yours and found my eye wondering around which can be a good thing but with nothing of interest to settle on which aint so good. Its as interesting as dry toast in fact.

    So I cropped it square and feel the impact and interest can come from the three dark trunks. Cuts out the pleasant colored bushes but after pleasant I could not find much reason to keep them. Bit of light added with a vignette hopefully to lead the eye through the shot. Just think it adds some pzazzz and impact to stop people and make them take a second look. Call it marmalade on ya toast.

    Not sure what the straggly weedy things are in the foreground but have an idea with the camera at ground level shooting through that bush your original shot may have worked.

  • #402398

    Michael
    Participant

    Very nice, thank you for your input…I didn’t think to shoot at ground level through the foreground bush.

  • #402404

    Graham Hart
    Participant

    Hi Michael, I like the lines in your pic which walk me through the scene from left to right. The foreground tree and the one behind it are the stars of the show and invite us to look down into the little gully beyond.

    So I think tightening up on those trees could help this pic. I think it could be more ‘intimate’ with a pano style crop which perhaps highlights the feeling of travelling through there. This crop helps to mimic the human sight line (as per cinemascope in movies). I think it also brings more focus to the terrain sloping away and adds dimension to the image. The wonderful trees guide us down that slope to the gully below.

  • #402414

    Michael
    Participant

    Very nice! Thank you.

  • #402445

    Frank
    Participant

    I do like the two crops, because I think they both help define what the subject is and to me the answer to that is the large curving tree.   As you look at your original image for a self-critic as you examine it, ask yourself, “What is the main subject?” or (What is the subject?)   And, then limit your answer to be very specific.   For example, answer “Tree” rather than “a pretty scene of trees and colorful springtime leaves in this desert environment”.    If the large tree is your subject, then ask, do I need the other trees especially the larger ones competing on the left side?  As the crops show, the answer is no and suddenly the large tree becomes much more prominent and important.  Our eyes are not wandering around looking at less important things taking away time spent looking at the main subject.

    Notice, too, both crops have either eliminated entirely or way reduced the impact of the bright right upper corner.  The square crop also makes the large branch on the left more to the front and it adds a nice frame effect to the main tree and a nice leading line down into the rest of the image.

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