Step Into The Shadows

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    • #430966
      Graham Hart
      Participant

      I don’t post much in this forum so here goes… give me both barrels. I’m experimenting with minimalist B&W images currently, trying to make something from otherwise unremarkable shots taken in the city. I might be just trying to polish a turd so your thoughts on if I have gone too far, not far enough, doesn’t really do anything for you etc. I see myself following this path at least for the near future so any advice to direct my efforts will be much appreciated.

    • #431002
      JasenkaG
      Keymaster

      I see this more as an illustration and less as a photograph, which isn’t bad at all. I would say that ”polishing a turd” worked pretty well here, since you’ve managed to transform an ordinary scene into this high-contrast geometric piece which is fun to look at.

      I can’t critique the image though, I just appreciate the idea.

      • #431075
        Graham Hart
        Participant

        Thanks for your thoughts Jasenka. You (and the others) are all correct about it being more of an illustration than a photograph. The comments posted here have helped me a lot in deciding what it is I’m trying to do. I did in fact get caught up in trying to make a geometric piece from a heavily shadowed architectural image of steel and steps……..which is not what I really want to achieve. I went too far.

        Thanks again for the feedback, its very much appreciated.

    • #431011
      Dahlia Ambrose
      Keymaster

      This looks like a posterized image Graham. I like all the shapes, lines and patterns and the edit works well for the harsh light in the scene. Sorry, I cannot find anything in terms of feedback to improve 🙂

      • #431076
        Graham Hart
        Participant

        Thanks Dahlia. I agree with your description of shapes, lines and patterns and that is what seduced me to venture into the outer reaches of the black point and the white point. I think this type of edit might be a good go-to with images shot in harsh overhead light where everything is already blown out so why not crank it up to the max?

        Thanks again for your thoughts.

    • #431014
      Petr Nowak
      Participant

      Great capture Graham. I like it a lot.
      I’d see it more balanced with removed left bright part (up to the shadow). The image has a nice palette of tones. The white point is a little bit heavy (more pure white areas) that makes the image more like an illustration. Visible people factor (some man silhouette somewhere) would form more interesting image.

      And be carefull when printing this one out. Pure white areas looks weird when printed. Some minimal level of gray is needed then.

      • #431078
        Graham Hart
        Participant

        Hi Petr, I agree with you about the bright left part. I think I knew it was overkill when editing but I liked the vertical bars so much I kept it all in. I should have done what you suggest and added some grey (or at least backed off from the white point).

        A person is the ultimate focus point so would definitely have helped, I agree. As a fisherman, I should have put more time into it and just waited for someone to come along. (I watched a youtube clip recently where someone said there are two types of street photographer – The Hunter and The Fisherman. The Hunter is always on the move seeking out his prey and The Fisherman sits and waits for his prey to come along).

        Thanks for your thoughts and tips, appreciated.

    • #431020
      Kent DuFault
      Participant

      Back in the old darkroom days, we used to create high contrast ‘graphic’ photographs using a special film called ‘Litho Film”. This looks just like a litho film photograph.

      https://www.lomography.com/films/871956671-arista-litho-film/photos

    • #431079
      Graham Hart
      Participant

      Checked out the link and I see the similarity Kent. Using exposure to enhance contrast is pretty much what I did. I think where I went wrong is that I applied it too selectively. The outer edges of the image are quite a stark pure B&W but the centre area (particularly the beams in the central dark patch) are softer in tone and contrast. This softer treatment is actually what I am trying to achieve overall so I think I need to explore using the gradient filter more so I can create those smoother transitions.

      Thanks for the help.

    • #431195
      bucweeet
      Participant

      If you’re using PS, possibly a circular radiant mask may do the trick for you. Then adjust the transparency Graham.

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