Still playing with this – suggestions – Rhinoscerus, Lady and Dove

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    • #447145
      Mistyisle
      Participant

    • #447682
      Frank
      Participant

      The trick is to make you composted images look as though they are really in the environment even though we know that the scene is not reality.  You have done an excellent job selecting out the rhino and the girl, but something is missing.  I think it is atmosphere, some emotion that is missing. Maybe the Rhino needs to be positioned differently. Maybe add more misty atmosphere to the background.  You need some drama.  But, I do not know how you get there, but….you need to watch some rafy-A.    Maybe you can catch some tips from this one:

       

    • #447683
      Frank
      Participant

      Maybe there needs to be some more connection between the human and the Rhino.  Why did you choose a rhino?  Why the woman?  I see peace vs. danger,  I see a dangerous animal stopped by a person in prayer or meditation, so there is some connection, but a bit esoteric.  With rafy, I see the wolf and little red riding hood.  The wolf is imposing, yet somehow not threatening.  You have a similar theme.  You have the rhino much larger which is effective.   Anyway…you are on to something….keep working it!  Another thought:  maybe the rhino needs to be back in the African wilds, not appearing in the woods.  Maybe we do not need to see animal, maybe just feet and head appearing out of the bush.

      • This reply was modified 1mo, 1wk ago by Frank.
    • #447722
      Mistyisle
      Participant

      Many thanks, Frank, excellent advice and useful feedback!  I will be sure to look at the video, which certainly looks very relevant and useful – need tips that help in these type of images.  Your understanding of the connection beween the rhino and the girl are much the same as mine.  I did think that a background more suited to a rhino would be better, however I only use photos that I have personally taken.  That is the rule of our camera club – so it is easier to use that rule, except for images of pure entertainment value.

      Probably I should look at using a different animal or using a background from our many trips over to Australia.  New Zealand has no dangerous animals, though sometimes someone has got in the way of an enraged bull, etc!

      Here is the photo of the original ceramic girl.

    • #447748
      Jasenka G
      Participant

      Interesting idea for sure! I think I would choose a real human figure for this scenario instead of a sculpture since right now this sculpture looks like a simplified model from a computer game while the background and rhino look more credible.

      • This reply was modified 1mo ago by Jasenka G.
    • #447957
      Frank
      Participant

      Okay Mistyisle, I think I might be setting you off in the wrong direction.  Rather than change animals or scenery, etc.  Keep this one and just work on some technique.  Right now your figures look to be just plunked in place.  So, start by trying to make them fit more into their place. Make it look as thought that rhino really was standing in that scene.  Start with the feet.Activate the layer it was on and reduce the opacity way down until you just see a vague outline.  Then grab a color of that dirt and paint over the bottom inch or so of the feet, then bring it back to full opacity and see if that helped make him look a bit more realistic as if he could be standing there, rather thank just plunked in by Photoshop.  Maybe do the same with the woman.  Maybe all you need to do is to blur the smooth line where her dress meets the ground.  See how sharp it looks in the image above.  Would it keep that same definition if she really was kneeling in the dirt?  No.  Next maybe try to bring in shafts of light coming at a diagonal from the upper or middle left right down onto the woman.  Or, maybe from the other side, beaming down most on the woman and not so much on the rhino.  Then you should create some shadow wherever you think it would actually show up.  Where exactly is the light coming from now?  I see shadow around the woman, yet the dove is very bright.  There is light directly in the center coming through the trees, yet there seems to be light hitting the back of the Rhino and there are shadows around his feet that look as though the light must be coming from above.  ( Look up about using radial gradients to create shafts  or beams or spots of light.)

      In conclusion, keep this image as is and just experiment with light and shadow and blurring to create mood and to help guide us where you want us to look, and  work on making  the figures look less like cut outs.  Maybe try to clone in some ferns or some of the greenery in front of the rhino’s legs or belly.  That might hide some of the sharper edges of the animal’s outline.

      • This reply was modified 1mo ago by Frank.
      • This reply was modified 1mo ago by Frank.
    • #448045
      Frank
      Participant

      Here are some real feet on the ground.   Left one must be moving, but note dark transition from shoe to ground.

       

       

    • #448078
      Mistyisle
      Participant

      Wow, Frank, I have just watched the video from the link you posted!  Amazing stuff, well above my pay grade!  However, I will watch again and areas such as the changes to the sky, I could emulate somewhat – great tips there.  I like what she/he did with Red Riding Hood’s hair, which may well help in another project I have on the go. Plus, of course how he tackled merging the feet and paws into the landscape.  I use Affinity Photo, not Photoshop,  but the ways everything was tackled are readily translatable.  Surprised that she/he did not use Blend If (which is called Blend Ranges in Affinity).

      Many thanks to for your other tips and ideas.  I will work further on this image (which was the earlier goal anyway).

      • This reply was modified 1mo ago by Mistyisle.
    • #448081
      Frank
      Participant

      She still looks as though she is floating!  Oh well…keep working on it.

    • #448629
      Anne Hornsby
      Participant

      @mistyisle   Hi, Jim.  I always enjoy your composite ideas, including this one.   I think the light on the back section of the rhinos back is too bright.   Another thought is that the rhino should be coming out of the brush (see my badly done version of this below).  Actually my thought in general is that your concept should be taken to a more fantastical level.   I was trying to make the girl more like a fairy sprite using the oil paint filter – it’s quite overdone but you get the idea.  I also tried a very low extrude filter on the rhino to also suggest the fantastical, and then blurred the forest.   It just seems that making the elements if this composite really crisp may possibly be why it isn’t working.    Keep experimenting and have fun!

      Frank, thanks for the video link.

    • #448694
      Graham Hart
      Participant

      Hi Jim, this post grabbed my interest because I’ve been watching some tutorials on colour matching lately. The thing which stands out to me is the colour mis-match between the BG, the girl and the Rhino. They have obviously been subjected to differing amounts of light and when combined into a composite image this becomes blatantly obvious. There are myriad ways of dealing with this in PS apparently so I had a rough go at trying to balance out the colours to show you the result of tackling this side of things. I’m still learning myself but it was good practice for me. It’s a bit rough because I only had the single layer image you posted to work with but with all the separate layers available it would be a lot easier to achieve a better result.
      First off I made masks of the girl, the rhino and the dove and then played around with curves adjustments to try and balance the light levels. Then I did a little hue/saturation adjustments to each. Next I used the blur tool to soften the edges of the subjects. I used the healing tool next to fix the halos around the edges (particularly the Rhino). finally, I added a shadow effect under the girl and the Rhino.
      It was a rough and ready job but you can maybe see what a difference matching colour and light makes to a composite image.

      • #449658
        JasenkaG
        Keymaster

        That’s a great suggestion Graham, I think this version looks pretty good when it comes to lighting.

    • #449652
      Mistyisle
      Participant

      Thanks again, Frank, Anne and Graham- some very valuable suggestions there.  I have got caught up with some other things, hence the delay in responding (Life gets in the Way!).  Yes, Graham, you are certainly right about matching colour and light, useful advice and reminder there.

      I will certainly get back to this, sometimes I have a break and work on something else, which seems to give my (sub-conscious?) time to work on it.  Currently on a project trying out many possibilities centred around a Steampunk theme.

       

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