Throwdown – Butterflies

This topic contains 61 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Tersha 1 hour, 26 minutes ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #418704

    Inspired by the images of Dave Watkins, Tersha and others.

    Monarch:

    DSC03671

     

  • #418705

    Rob Eyers
    Participant

    Well this is fortuitous. It just so happens that this Monarch came out of chrysalis at noon today. The chrysalis is jade green until the final hours when it changes to being nearly transparent.

    Chrysalis in change

    chrysalis_6.jpg

    Immediately after emerging

    Monarch_side_1-2.jpg

    After an hour or so of drying it’s wings.

    Monarch_top_2.jpg

    I left the room for 10 minutes and missed it emerging. I’ll have to try again tomorrow as there’s another chrysalis starting to change.

    • #418710

      What an amazing thing to witness Rob. Great set of images.

       

    • #418741

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Great series Rob. Would love to see that in person. As beautiful as they are the name Monarch fits them well. Looking forward to seeing more of these from you.

    • #418764

      Dahlia Ambrose
      Keymaster

      Wow! Thank you for sharing this Rob. Amazing to look at the transformation πŸ™‚

  • #418706

    Rob Eyers
    Participant

    Nice capture David. (this should be up under David’s post…hmmm)

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by  Rob Eyers.
  • #418711

    Blue tiger:

    DSC02283

     

    • #418742

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Another beautiful butterfly that is not around here. Nice shot.

    • #418765

      Dahlia Ambrose
      Keymaster

      Gorgeous colours and mood. Love it David πŸ™‚

  • #418723

    Graham Hart
    Participant

    An oldie;

  • #418740

    Dave Watkins
    Participant

    Like Rob this reply to David’s first post shows up at the bottom.

    Beautiful shot. I wish we had Monarchs in our area.

  • #418745

    Dave Watkins
    Participant

    Two pics of a Painted Lady from yesterday.

    • #418767

      Dahlia Ambrose
      Keymaster

      Love these Dave. Very beautiful πŸ™‚

      • #418783

        Dave Watkins
        Participant

        Thanks Dahlia. This one obviously fresher than the one I posted with the yellow background. She/he has been around for a few days now. Never leaves that Tall Verbena.

  • #418746

    Dave Watkins
    Participant

  • #418771

    Orchard swallowtail (female)

    PC220055

    PC220060

     

    • #418779

      Rob Eyers
      Participant

      That’s a beautiful one David. We don’t have those here. Very interesting.

    • #418780

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Wow! Fantastic shots David. I don’t see flowers so not after nectar. Do you know if that’s a host plant it’s on? Maybe laying eggs?

      • #418794

        You got it Dave – laying eggs. These butterflies lay their eggs on citrus plants, the hatching caterpillars (known as bird-poo caterpillars – see below) feed on the citrus leaves. They are often considered a pest, but we welcome them in our garden.

        Early instar caterpillar:

        DSC04648

        Later instar caterpillar:

        caterpillar

         

    • #418793

      LeanneC
      Participant

      I love the second image, David! Such a cool perspective.

  • #418781

    Rob Eyers
    Participant

    I’ve been raising Monarchs along with others in the Windsor/Essex County area of southern Ontario. We’re doing this in the hopes of raising the numbers in the wild. They only lay eggs on the milkweed plant. This is the only food the caterpillars will eat and a lot of milkweed has been destroyed over the years. Raising the caterpillars indoors keeps them away from predators which increases the surviving percentage.

    This Monarch emerged from its chrysalis around noon today. The sequence shown here takes less than a minute. At this point the wings have not yet been inflated.

    _V4A3909 copy 3a.jpg

    • #418784

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Love it! Great job Rob. Tomorrow we’re driving down to Brookings for a Western Monarch festival on Saturday. And coincidentally they’ve had a bit of a Monarch population explosion there recently.

      Update: No Monarchs have showed up to take advantage of the Milkweed we planted last spring. πŸ™‚ Other pollinators are using it though. We only planted eight. Four Showy and four Narrowleaf. But they’ve already tripled that number on their own.

    • #418842

      P71
      Participant

      Jaw droppingly gorgeous work Rob , thanks for posting.

  • #418786

    Dave Watkins
    Participant

    My trucks bumper.

  • #418795

    LeanneC
    Participant

    I am enjoying viewing this throwdown. Sadly, we don’t get Monarchs where we live. However, we had a surprise in our curly willow this spring, in the form of some odd looking caterpillars that we soon discovered to be Mourning Cloaks. We decided to take them in (to control the destruction on the willow and observe them as they went through their changes). I was slightly horrified to learn that they molt several times before making their chrysalis. It was fascinating, watching them eat, grow and change. Here are some shots showing their life cycle (as much as we saw of it):

    Mourning Cloak Caterpillar

    Prayer Position

    Chrysalis

    Stretching its Wings

    So Long

    If You Love Somebody

    • #418819

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Great series Leanne. That is so cool that you and your family got to see the metamorphosis from caterpillar to butterfly. And to top it off it was a Mourning Cloak. An exceptionally beautiful butterfly in my book.

    • #418823

      Rob Eyers
      Participant

      Very nice series Leanne. The whole process is interesting isn’t it. They do like to crawl on your finger just after emerging. Odd that they’re so skittish afterwards. Love the image with you daughter.

  • #418843

    P71
    Participant

    • #418852

      Rob Eyers
      Participant

      Two great shots Pat. Where do you live?…I’ve never seen either of these. Do you know what they are called?

      • #418854

        P71
        Participant

        Hi Rob , i live in n.ireland (belfast)

        Top one is called a common blue , seen loads this year

        photo 2 is a Painted lady

        Look hereΒ https://www.ulsterwildlife.org/wildlife-explorer/invertebrates/butterflies-and-moths

        This place is literally out my sisters back yard ( i’m very lucky ) πŸ˜‰

         

        • #418863

          Rob Eyers
          Participant

          Thanks for the link Pat. Yes you are very lucky if you have all of those around you. We visited Belfast a few years ago on a circle tour of the island. Lovely country and wonderful folks. We’ll be back again, but that trip will be in a car on our own time, so we can stop and talk to the fairies if we like. πŸ˜‰

  • #418844

    P71
    Participant

    • #418851

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Love both of these P71. I’ve had quite a bit fun photographing butterflies this year. Hope you had fun too.Β  πŸ™‚

  • #418855

    P71
    Participant

    First time for me Dave and it was a lot of fun , looking forward to next year already .. thanks very much mate.

    Still need to identify this one.

    Found it – Orange-tip

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 5 days ago by  P71.
    • This reply was modified 1 week, 5 days ago by  P71.
  • #418859

    P71
    Participant

    Micropterix calthella, the marsh marigold moth

    Can just about see these little ones with naked eye

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 5 days ago by  P71.
    • #419306

      Tersha
      Keymaster

      You’ve some good shots here Patrick, I don’t think I would have known this one was a butterfly!

  • #418864

    Rob Eyers
    Participant

    So here goes one more from yesterday. Not a lot of variety from me. I’ll have to dig through so oldies.

    If you haven’t watched one emerge then you may not have seen how the wings are very small and shriveled up. After a couple of minutes to rest up from the struggle of getting out they begin to pump fluids from the abdomen out though veins in the wings. The whole process takes about two minutes at most.

    • #419304

      Tersha
      Keymaster

      That’s really wonderful Rob!

      • #419328

        P71
        Participant

        Absolutely agree wow.

    • #419380

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Love it!

  • #419274

    P71
    Participant

  • #419307

    Tersha
    Keymaster

    Comma …

    comma on field scabious

    • #419378

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      I like the light/dark contrast of the wings, beautiful background.

  • #419309

    Rob Eyers
    Participant

    From the wayback machine…Blue Morpho

    Blue Morpho

     

    • #419379

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      Wow! What a beautifully colored butterfly. Nice shot Rob.

    • #419418

      Tersha
      Keymaster

      Stunning blue Rob!

  • #419377

    Dave Watkins
    Participant

    In flight.

    • #419419

      Tersha
      Keymaster

      That’s pretty clever Dave, cool shot!

      • #419469

        Dave Watkins
        Participant

        Thanks Diane. Shot at 1/2000 to stop the motion. Went back and tried to get one showing just a bit of motion using 1/1600 and 1/1250 but didn’t even get one keeper. It’s supposed to be rainy for the next four days so any new butterfly pics are on hold.

  • #419420

    Tersha
    Keymaster

    Resting Peacock butterfly…

    peacock on tarmac

    • #419470

      Dave Watkins
      Participant

      We don’t have those around here. It’s beautiful. Was the ground, or rock, it’s on wet? I ask because to ingest minerals butterflies “puddle.” They land on wet ground, animal carcasses and animal and bird poop to get nutrients nectar doesn’t provide.

      I’ve learned a number of strange facts about butterflies this year after putting in the butterfly garden and reading about them.Β  πŸ™‚

      • #419489

        Tersha
        Keymaster

        Strangely it was a small strip of old tarmac in-between the grass and wild flowers, I was parked in a lay-by in a grass verge in the forest. It may well have been wet, as I remember the grass was wet in places. I never knew that about them landing on wet ground, and other things. I’ve seen them settle on brick, and old logs, and always assumed to was to get some heat.
        pic from a couple of years back ..

        resting on a log

  • #419615

    Dave Watkins
    Participant
    • #419773

      Tersha
      Keymaster

      They get into some odd places!

  • #419774

    Tersha
    Keymaster

    tortoiseshell

    tortoiseshell on michaelmas

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