Barn – B&W ISO100 f/5.6 ss 1/320 50mm lens

Latest Posts Photography Forums The Shark Tank Barn – B&W ISO100 f/5.6 ss 1/320 50mm lens

This topic contains 21 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  Frank 3 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #405254

    Dorothy
    Participant

    Ok, back to b&w – i need some input, would this be considered landscape? for some reason i don’t feel a personal connection with this like i do with most photos i take, i mean i like it (obviously it caught my eye enough for me to shoot it) but is it just an old barn on a hill?  i don’t think we have to love everything we shoot but how do we know if it is still worth keeping.  is there someone out there that loves old barns (i mean almost everyone loves something) that would consider this worth having?  is there a way of knowing something is good even if you are not crazy about it yourself.  Old Barn B&Wok, that’s my food for thought, now critiquing, what can i do to make this better?

  • #405263

    Richard Barnard
    Participant

    I would like to know why the genre of this photograph is important to you. For what its worth I don’t see a problem labelling this ‘landscape’ but assigning your image to a particular genre isn’t going to change either its content or your personal response.

    Why shoot on the basis that there may be someone out there who likes the image more than you do? I think you have to shoot for yourself. If you don’t love or connect with a scene and have a clear personal vision of what it is you want to portray then I think that is going to be reflected in your output. An ‘old barn on a hill’ remains just that and nothing more.

    In terms of improvements it does seem under exposed and lacking in contrast and tonal range but nothing that a tweek with curves adjustment couldn’t resolve. But, if you are not personally taken with this shot, if you are not sure if it’s worth keeping and just see it as ‘an old barn on the hill’ why bother? I would suggest it’s better to use the time to get out with your camera and shoot something that excites you.

  • #405264

    billyspad
    Blocked

    Its quite obviously an old barn on a hill so who gives a flying fig about what genre it could be placed in? The fact that you feel no association with the image shows in your PP which is, compared to your usual high standard, perfectly awful.

    My thoughts on the image echo yours the difference being I would not have bothered with the B/W conversion would not have posted it and would not seek answers to questions without real answers. As Richard suggests dump it and find a subject that floats ya boat.

  • #405296

    Tom M
    Participant

    This photo is ok, not a wall hanger, but keep it anyway. Something you can learn from. Billy gave some thought that the pp needs some work, but I think I would like the color version of this, perhaps post that too. Perhaps an improvement could have been to get a lower shot, maybe so the house roof in the bg wouldn’t show. The overall tone of the shot is sort of a muddied gray, need some contrast Oh, I love barns…

     

  • #405338

    Dorothy
    Participant

    Richard, Billy & Tom:  so a little explanation. the question as to if it is landscape comes from in my head “What is Landscape” there is a totally separate forum here for Landscape and i wondered is it meant for just sweeping vistas or what exactly. probably should have just posted that question by itself in the chit chat forum. (i will do that next)

    i have to agree, only reason to keep is to have a lesson on what i don’t want to show as my work.

    We always want to learn how to improve but i think one thing we need to learn is to just walk away.  it is easy to throw out the out of focus, blurry, poorly lit, and any other obviously not worth saving photo (especially with digital because we can take so many and not be concerned with the cost of film and film development – which has made it too easy to think “oh i can fix it in PP” rather than shoot for the best SOC), its harder to self critique and say “Yep, that wasn’t worth the time it took to shoot it.”

    Billy, on the nose, PP does not show my heart. it will be one of my self critiquing rules to consider from hereon – if i don’t love doing the PP then it is most likely not worth the time to PP.

    I am moving on from this one.  Thanks guys.

    Tom:  Here is the same barn, different view, color.old barn - front - color

     

    • #405339

      Dorothy
      Participant

      first shot in colorold barn - hill - color

      • #405666

        Sarthak Choudhary
        Participant

        I liked the BW version more, I know I have a weird taste.

        I don’t know why but the BW version reminded of the movie ‘To kill a mockingbird’!

  • #405358

    Steve Walker
    Participant

    Old barns and buildings are nearly a genre unto themselves. Conversely, some consider any evidence of “the hand of man” disqualifying an image as landscape. As others have said, these classifications are only occasionally relevant. As others have said, the image could benefit from an increse in brightness and contrast. The fence isn’t a particularly leading line. I also agree that the lack of engagement by the photographer somehow finds its way into the image.

    • #405521

      Dorothy
      Participant

      Thanks Steve.  it may be the fence that has thrown me off of this photo. i liked this barn when i took it but it obviously did not keep my interest or i would have probably given it more loving care.

  • #405477

    Petr Nowak
    Participant

    Dorothy, from the technical point of view I miss a contrast in the first image (hint, if you’re not PP lover: simply adjust black and white point in levels).
    The color version is much better imho. I like the color of grass versus reddish-brown color of barn.
    Btw the shape of the roof is very interesting.

    • #405522

      Dorothy
      Participant

      Thanks Petr: (i have a somewhat anal nature so i actually love PP which emphasizes even more my lack of it in this photo)  i think i was trying too hard to make this black and white rather than just enjoying the color.  yes, i thought the roof peak was really different.

  • #405526

    Robert Apple
    Moderator

    I thought photos of man made structures where that structure is the focal point we’re considered architectural .

    • #405530

      Dorothy
      Participant

      lol – well, i certainly opened a can of worms….   now if they were, the focal point, sitting on the end of a pier with a lone fishing pole lying beside them, looking over a beautiful lake with mountains in the distance, that would be considered……?

      • #405533

        Robert Apple
        Moderator

        Well if the pole is sitting idle, it would be a waste of a can of worms.

        • #405541

          Dorothy
          Participant

          roflmao – thank you Robert, that was wonderful, sometimes we get all wrapped up in stuff so seriously we forget the joy of it all.

  • #405695

    Gary Zerbst
    Participant

    I started in film B&W which may explain my liking of old  barns wih lots of texture.  After looking at Dorothy’s barn for a while, I decided that the photo had good bones but the bones were obscure too much by the surroundings (in this analogy-too much fat?)  Anyway  I carefully cloned out the fence line, which had  cut the composition in two,  then started adjusting  the tones and cropping in successive stages.  BTW, I think that I ended up cropping out all my careful fence and path cloning.  Anyway I have arrived at a composition that my paradigms  prefer and can now appreciate the weathering and patina of age on the barn siding  to go with the hole in the roof.

    Hoping you enjoy it.

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    • #405697

      Dorothy
      Participant

      Nicely done Gary, Thanks!

  • #405713

    Frank
    Participant

    Good questions to ask, Dorothy.  “Good” because I often have faced the same dilemma with my own photos.  I begin to understand images like this as images that “set the scene”.  You saw this, liked the scene, so you took the shot.  But, next look for scenes within the scene.  It was the barn and its age that interested you, I assume.  There is something interesting about old barns, so take images that show the age.  Get in close, look for images that do not include all of the barn.  Let’s see the age of the walls, maybe detail of the hole and the broken lumber around it.  Any interesting hardware on the door?  What about variations of the barn’s color, fading paint, peeling patches, old rot? Any interesting lines or texture in the stone foundation?   What about the perspective of lying down and looking up along the front corner and show how the corner bends toward the peak. Can you get a shot that emphasizes the sag in the ridge line? Anyway, you get my point. Spend time just photographing parts of the barn.   I think you have found a wonderful subject.

  • #405816

    Frank
    Participant

    I do like the barn “different view and color.”  From that angle I see more elements of interest.  The green grass and red of the barn go well together.  I also not a “keep Out ” sign which means you probably could not have gotten closer to the barn to photograph as I suggested with no one around to ask permission to do so.  Also, I do not mind the fence in the original as others do. I think it adds a nice diagonal lines that helps frame in the barn with the tree being the frame on the other side.  But, it does bring the barn more into the present, mixing a new fence with and old barn.  In a B&W version you might experiment with a sepia look that would make it look like an old photo.  Try , too, to get more contrast between grass and barn.    Lots of options, but still a interesting subject, the old barn.  (not a typical shape that we see in New England.)

  • #405855

    Frank
    Participant

  • #405856

    Frank
    Participant

    My favorite.  Applied a little red paint, darkened the grass a tad, replaced cyan with more blue.   Not sure about the fence. Took out the white tops to the posts.

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