Heading home at magic hour iso 6400. 89 mm. f4

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This topic contains 15 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Barb 2 weeks, 5 days ago.

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  • #422045

    Barb
    Participant

    Heading home at magic hour

  • #422074

    Rob Eyers
    Participant

    Hi Barb. Thanks for including the EXIF. Next time it would be good to include your shutter speed as well. Not a lot of noise for ISO 6400…what camera are you using?

    It looks like you have a good handle on your camera settings as the sky isn’t blown and the scene is appropriately lit. The first thing I would do is straighten the image as it’s leaning to the right. All the power lines etc. make for a busy image but that would be hard to avoid in Mississauga. Without a more zeroed in on subject it’s more of a snapshot.

    Let’s see what others have to say.

    Welcome. Good to have another fellow Ontarian here.

    • #422360

      Barb
      Participant

      Hi, Rob. I’m shooting with a Canon EOS Rebel T6i. The shutter was 1/4000.

      Do newbie photographers lean to the left or right? Now that you mention it, I can see that I’m leaning in other photos that I’ve taken.

      As for the subject… darn good point. Really appreciate the feedback.

  • #422089

    Frank
    Participant

    I like the blues, the red lights and seeing the cars coming and going.  But, what is your subject?  What is the interest that makes us want to look at this image or grabs our attention?  Why do you include all those wires? Is they sky important?  Done need to read the signs on the buildings? How could you make this different from any other rush hour?  A favorite mentor on teaching photography is John Shaw.  He says if you need a paragraph to explain your photo it is not successful as one in which you only need one word!

    • #422361

      Barb
      Participant

      Thank you, Frank. I must look up John Shaw. Love the advice.

       

  • #422090

    Frank
    Participant

    Correction   “Done need” should be “Do we need”.  Is the image too dark?   Clone out the  distracting letters “ORE” on the left!

  • #422091

    Petr Nowak
    Participant

    Interesting image. It lacks some main subject I think. I’d choose some theme and focus on it only – on cars to catch movement (long exposure time probably) or on the sky with electricity poles to catch this.

    • #422362

      Barb
      Participant

      Great idea, Peter. You should have joined me on the shoot. Next time.

  • #422151

    Lenny Wollitz
    Participant

    Hi Barb.  Looks technically good but compo is lacking an obvious subject.  I have read that the subject should be half to 3/4 of what attracts the eye and have some interest.  My eye can’t find anything to stop and look at.

    • #422363

      Barb
      Participant

      Well said, Lenny. I forgot to study art in school — and I regret that. Thank you so much. I hope that I remember all the fundamentals when I head out next.

  • #422157

    Erik Fransman
    Participant

    Hi Barb,

    It is definitely missing something. It’s also a bit blend.

    If you make it a more cinematic aspect ratio, it starts to work a bit better.
    I did B&W. In order to try to add a possible story, I dodged the white car coming towards us a bit. So it looks like it can’t wait to speed away when the light turns green.

  • #422364

    Barb
    Participant

    About telling a story — I suppose I felt a bit out of my element standing on the corner with my camera, looking for a story. I thought telling stories with a camera would be easier than it is.

    Note to self: look up cinematic aspect ratio. Thank you for the feedback.

     

    I like the first scene of your movie.

    • #422389

      Erik Fransman
      Participant

      Barb, Every picture tells a story, if not, don’t click. But telling a story can be as simple as a beautiful sunset that gives you an emotion, or a situation that makes you laugh, cry or at least feel something. A story does not have to be “Once upon a time, there was…. (and so on) “.

      The proportional relationship between the height and width of a rectangle is what is aptly referred to as an aspect ratio. In the old analog film days, the aspect ratio was usually determent by the size of the negative you used. 6×6 (120mm roll) 35 mm or large format. Most of the time the images were printed as the negative.
      In cinema it started in 1907 with 1.33:1 (Silent / Full Frame. A big change in 1932 when the Academy of Motion Pictures of America announced the new standard, “Academy”, 1.37:1. This is the aspect ratio that you see on ALL the movies till about 1953 when filmmakers started to work with another aspect ratio’s like Widescreen (1.66:1) and for major cinema productions Cinerama that could range from 1:85.1 to 2.39:1 (cinemascope)

      Nowadays, digital, we can do whatever we want. (Truer for photography then movies)
      How often do we see in this forum the suggestion “crop the top”. By doing that, you change the aspect ratio.

  • #422423

    Barb
    Participant

    Thank you, Erik. That helps.

  • #423015

    Mario
    Participant

    Hello and thanks for sharing.

    ISO and shutter speed are too high.

    There are no fast moving objects since the traffic light is red and the cars are waiting. Would have gone with maybe 1/200 and bring the ISO down.

     

    All the best.

  • #423165

    Barb
    Participant

    Good point, Mario. I guess I was anticipating the movement. Next time I’ll wait.
    I appreciate the note. Thanks.

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