Castle Hill

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    • #449118
      Renee P
      Participant

      50MM, 1/125, f/20, iso 100    Do the colors look off?

      Castle Hill

      • This topic was modified 3wk, 5d ago by Renee P.
    • #449121
      Renee P
      Participant

      1/500, f/8, iso 200  What do you think of this one?

      sweet little girl

    • #449191
      beth
      Participant

      in the first the colors look a little over-saturated.  also remember to check your edges for cut off objects, like the boat on the far right.  and you really need to clean your sensor.

      the first one also looks soft, possibly due to the small aperture.  picking an aperture is a little tricky and counter intuitive.  a wide aperture (f/2.8, f/3.5, f/4) will give you a shallow dof in some cases.  so it makes sense to choose a smaller aperture (f/8, f/11, f/14) to get more in focus.  but once you reach f/16 and smaller apertures most lenses start to show diffraction, which softens the details and degrades image quality.  if you look at the second image in comparison there’s much more detail.  you can see stitching on the girl’s bathing suit while in the first the screw heads on the chair are fairly blurry.

      the second is much sharper and the exposure settings make sense for the scene.  it has clean edges and a decent composition.  try upping the contrast on that one so you make use of the entire range of tones.  i’m at work and don’t have the software to do it, but i bet if i looked at the histogram it would be clumped in the middle.  it’s already fairly dark so lift your midtones and try to get a few whites in there.

    • #449204
      Dahlia Ambrose
      Keymaster

      Hi Renee, I agree with Beth’s comments about cutting off the boat on the right and cleaning the dust specks. You could also have a little more space at the bottom if possible. I like the second image as it is 🙂

       

    • #449238
      Falxy
      Participant

      Hi Renee….one image at a time in the ST would be helpfull

      Love the 2nd image………2 things

      1.as portrait works well but would of cropped in,especially from the top or 2.taken as landscape with the girl on the third.

      Think you are between the two……still very nice! 🙂

    • #449240
      Renee P
      Participant

      @beth And. @falxy  thank you for you comments.  This is really helping me learn!  Now if I can just pull it all together!

    • #449245
      Graham Hart
      Participant

      Hi Renee, I agree with what’s been said already.
      Pic 1: Beth has hit all the technical points and is far more capable of interpreting them than I. From a creative point of view, Dahlia is spot on too. The chairs feel a little squashed in at the bottom. More space below and less sky above would place the far horizon on the ‘thirds’ line and balance the pic better I think by enhancing a feeling of relaxed space as the world sails by….even more so with a person or people sitting in those chairs. (You definitely need to clean your sensor)

      Pic 2: Again beth is spot on. There seems to be a lot of room to play with the tones in this pic. It is fairly flat in contrast and this could be tweaked a bit to add dimension to the image (brighter brights, darker darks).
      Creatively, I also think Falxy’s idea of a landscape aspect is a good idea here. The portrait style directs the eyes from the girl to the top of the image where we only find the out-of-focus water in the distance. (A big fin or something there would be a bonus 🙂 ). With the midrange aperture of f8, a landscape aspect would firstly enhance her environment and add more clarity around her. The top area of the image after the second frothy wave doesn’t really add much to the image. Something like…

    • #449290
      Renee P
      Participant

      @beth and @falxy  @DahliaAmbrose  @GrahamHart   I didn’t even realize that I put both of these pics in the same post!  That’s a beginner for you!  Thank you for your comments.  All are very helpful and appreciated.  I am very new to LR and even newer to PS.  would you suggest any area in LR or PS to focus on?  When others adjust my pictures, I can see the difference and can see one looks better then the other but I still don’t knowexactly how they achieved that.   I have so much to learn!

      • #449292
        beth
        Participant

        lightroom is great for global edits.  what i mean by that is you can quickly edit the whole photo.  so i would focus on lightroom for now.  it’s very easy to use and will get a beginner to a finished image every time.

        when you start realizing that lightroom isn’t enough you can focus adding photoshop and learning the skills you need as you go.  i always start in lightroom, do about 75-95% of my editing and then move into photoshop to finish up with the small details, like cloning out a spot, editing small areas with the use of masks, or doing an edit i can’t do in lightroom.

        i save all of my files without resizing or sharpening.  when i need to print the image or resize it for the web i’ll make a copy and do all of my resizing and sharpening in photoshop.  that can also be done in lightroom, but i’m used to doing it in photoshop.

    • #449314
      Frank
      Participant

      Beth points out “LR is great for global edits”, but there are tools you should work on to help with local adjustments, or changes to specific areas a photo.  Three main ones are:  the Adjustment Brush, and the Gradient Filter (and the Radial Filter).

      Click on the Adjustment Brush and you will see a whole column of things you can “paint” into a specific area with a brush of any size.  Let’s say you want to add light to the girl on the beach.  Move the Exposure slider slightly to the right, then paint over the girl with the brush. If you paint, too, much or in the wrong place, you can quickly remove the effect, too.  Let’s say you want to darken the sky in the sailboat photo.  Click on the Gradient Tool. You will again see a column of choices.  Move the exposure slider slightly to the left. Put the curser at the top of the sky.  To draw a straight line down, hold the shift key as you drag the cursor down to the horizon line, and the sky should darken. With both tools if you check the  Mask Options, you will see where the effects you make are taking effect.  Click on the color box and choose a pink (magenta) by moving the slider to the far right, and that will give you a bright color to see the Mask.  Unclick the box and the pink will disappear.  Click the Overlay Box to put a pin or point where you begin your adjustment on the image.  These changes are not permanent.  You can always revert back to where you started.  Spend some time practicing with these tools and you will soon be adding them to your work flow.

      BTW  if you have a gray , cloudy, dull sky.  use the gradient tool on it  darkening it and often you will be surprised to see detail jump into the clouds.

    • #449315
      Graham Hart
      Participant

      Hi Renee, Beth is right about LR being a great intro into the world of image editing and global adjustments. PS is quite complex and much harder to learn but it does have more power once you know how to use it. It is based on a ‘layer’ system where any adjustments to an image reside on a separate layer allowing those adjustments to be targeted to specific areas of an image. Quite a steeper learning curve but much easier to understand once you have a working knowledge of LR because all image adjustments and terminologies are common to both LR and PS….they just go about it in different ways.

      Not only that but LR’s real benefit is it’s ability to organise all your images on your computer. A Google search of LR will bring up endless youtube videos on how to do anything you want in Lightroom (and PS).

      Having said that, I jumped straight into PS early in my learning curve through no other reason than I had an old version (v6 I think?) pirate copy someone gave me on disc when I first started getting interested in photography. By the time PS emailed me a year later to say I should buy a registered copy or else, I was already well into a basic understanding of it. Neeedless to say, for the cost of a cup of coffee (about $4/week), I signed up and got not only the latest versions of LR and PS but also all updates free thereafter! Now I regret to say I struggle with Lightroom which is annoying because I know damn well that I could do most of what I do much easier in Lightroom but I’ve chosen my path and will stick to it.

    • #449753
      Gary Zerbst
      Participant

      Renee,    I liked your yacht regatta photo a lot.  But I nevertheless l played with it a bit in my mind then , believing it to be a viable candidate for my perverse sense of composition, I did a little cropping. as follows:   The horizon in the middle of the frame , while not distracting in this particular photo still makes the scene a little static,  Also the expanse of featureless blue sky adds nothing to the photo IMHO.  I , therefore,  cropped out quite a bunch of sky which serendipitously  put the horizon near the upper one thirds line. Then I cropped in slightly from both sides (edge patrol)    Now if only there was a person in a blue blazer wearing a white straw hat or a lady in a white frilly gown with a wide brimmed hat festooned with flowers  sitting in the right most Adirondak  chair, the story of financial privilege during an earlier time would be quite enhanced (and the visual weights in the photo would be more balanced)    I have also slightly dropped the saturation and very slightly cut the contrast then compensated with a tiny bit of sharpening.   All my post processing for this photo was done in Apple’s PHOTOS App   (comes standard on every Mac)

      PS  In my ineptitude I could not find in your profile if you allowed modifications  to  your photos and re-posting.  I  gambled that  the odds were in the favor of such permission and just went ahead with my playing with your image.  I hope that you don’t mind and also that your intent for the  photo has not been trampled on.  

    • #449788
      Tobie
      Moderator

      Lots of good stuff said above. I was going to suggest Graham’s crop of the girl for the following reason: in general it’s ‘easier on the eye’ if most empty space occurs on the side a subject is looking to.

      I wouldn’t chop off the chairs’ legs as in Gary’s crop and I would have cropped them a little off-centre.

      Focus 80% of your effort on learning Lightroom. Everything about it. Spend the rest of your effort on learning other tools like Photoshop.

    • #449889
      Anne Hornsby
      Participant

      Hi, Renee  @reneep    great discussion here.  I really like how Graham added grass to the bottom of the seaview image.   On the girl & surf image,   I like this image.  I see halo fringing around her arms, so am guessing you’ve already done some adjustments.  I tried doing what Beth suggested  – increase the range of tones.    (I’m still learning LR & PS – ignore the line in the surf from my selection. :))

      I really prefer having more beach behind her (at below of the image) so left all of that all and cropped from the top.    I also removed sand footprints at the bottom, brightened her suit and darkened the bucket to make it closer in tint to her.   It’s fun to have so many different views and ideas!   Enjoy.

    • #450078
      Renee P
      Participant

      @garyzerbst thank you for you comments and no I don’t mind others playing with my photos at all.  It’s amazing the sidle differences you can get from everyone’s point of few.  Great for learning!

    • #450080
      Renee P
      Participant

      @annehornsby I love what you did!  I’m going to try and do achieve the same thing!  Thank you!

    • #450574
      Bruce Gordon
      Participant

      I agree with everyone, but I would suggest that you have your sensor cleaned by a camera shop. If I can’t clear it with a dry air blower, it’s off to the shop for a professional clean. It’s only about 100 USD; must cheaper than a damaged sensor… I have to do it about once a year, as I’m always changing lenses in the wild…

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