Water

This topic contains 11 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  Frank 3 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #398420

    Stephen
    Participant

    puddles

    Rain on newly painted metal staircase. CC pleas
    iso 200
    f6.4
    1/50 sec
    55mm

    Edited on newly purchased Luminar 3

  • #398424

    Kent DuFault
    Participant

    It’s a really interesting pattern abstract photograph. Your execution is spot-on. I don’t have any CC. Nice shot! Some might complain about the vignette. I like the use of a vignette, so it appeals to me.

  • #398433

    Richard Barnard
    Participant

    Wonderful abstract and nicely executed. I’m afraid I am one of the people who is going to complain about the vignette! It’s just a tad too noticeable for me and becomes a distraction. Still a great image though.

  • #398437

    Frank
    Participant

    Hard to critique abstracts with so many options for your composition.  I wonder why you cropped off the edge of the interesting big shape lower left?  Nevertheless, I do like the way you have included all those wonderful smaller shapes, then one big one.  I think it is really neat you found such a unique image.  It reminds me of similar looks on the hood of cars after a rain, but usually the shapes are round or ovals, unlike these ones.   I have learned that vignetting should be subtle and meant to draw attention to a subject.  So, find ways to make vignetting hardly noticeable and they do not always have to be placed in the corners.   Also, I like the darkness in the left lower corner, but not so much in the other upper corners, so keep in mind that vignetting does not have to be uniform.

  • #398469

    billyspad
    Blocked

    Superbly converted to B/W a really first class job. Vignettes always split the pack so just please yaself on that one.

    To those not into abstracts or random/repeating patterns and all the other artistic photography cliches that could apply this subject is possibly about as interesting as watching paint dry. But stick to your vision and run with it is what I say. Publish and be damned as the man said.

  • #398487

    Graham Hart
    Participant

    I really like this. I can almost see the negative version where the troughs have been etched out of a flat shiny surface. Gotta love the oxymoron of a random pattern!

  • #398510

    Dorothy
    Participant

    Stephen: Ok, i have to say, i see this in a comic book, puzzle pieces dropped in the rain are the clue to the entire mystery. (it is a comic book like dick tracy or superman).  I am drawn into this and it captures my imagination.  i know we are suppose to offer constructive criticism here in the ST  but the only thing I would speak to would be to use the vignette only just a tad lighter, don’t eliminate any of it. (and yes, i know i am aging myself but those were comic books i read as a kid – 2 brothers with comics)

  • #398514

    Robert Apple
    Moderator

    Your Photo was recognized in the Members Picks Week of April 1 Forum  ⬅ Click Here

  • #398559

    I’d be one of those who said the vignette is a bit heavy. 😉

  • #398604

    Stephen
    Participant

    Thank you all for your comments. looking at the photo again I agree the Vignette is a little too strong. I am happy with the photo as it is a colour photo, not converted to B/W, but the stairs have recently been painted black.

  • #398809

    Frank
    Participant

    Hope I’m not be-laboring the vignetting thing, but here is a link showing how to add subtle vignetting:

    Creative Vignette Effects With The Radial Filter In Photoshop CC

  • #398814

    Frank
    Participant

    Okay, one more thanks to John Flurry on f/stoppers.com

    1  create a 50% grey layer  2  change the mode to overlay or soft light

    3  Select Filter > Lens Correction    4  in the opening window, Choose Custom

    5  Look down to the Vignette sliders start to play with the sliders and note the effects on the grey screen      6  Click Okay

    7  Play with the Opacity on the original image

    A nice method to control subtle vignetting to bring subtle attention to the lighter parts of your image and main subject.

     

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